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100 years ago today: the Fairday washer & the Delco-Light plant

'The timing of the April 4th ad in the News possibly was tied to another event in Columbia. Only had recent days had Mr. G.B. Smith, after a delay of several weeks not of his own making, finally gotten into operation the new electric plant, pulling Columbia out of the darkness into which it had been unwillingly plunged some three months earlier.' - JIM
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By JIM

An ad for a Fairday Twin Washer appeared in the Wednesday, April 4, 1917 edition of the Adair County News. (Note the name of the local agent shown in the image below.) This marvelous machine could be run either with electricity or with an engine powered by gasoline or other fuel.

The washer, manufactured by the well-known Fairbanks, Morse & Company (dba Fairbanks-Morse) had been on the market since at least 1916 and continued to be manufactured, with modifications and improvements, through at least 1938, when the advertising tag was "A Fairday washer makes every wash day a fairday for the modern housewife."



In the summer of 1917, an ad in The Lynden Tribune (Lynden, Wash.) proclaimed, "The Fair Day is an electric washer, a beauty--and it's absolutely safe for any woman to handle. There are no cogs on the lid, and all the gears are covered and out of the way, so that it is impossible to catch a sleeve or a skirt in the machinery."

The timing of the April 4th ad in the News possibly was tied to another event in Columbia. Only had recent days had Mr. G.B. Smith, after a delay of several weeks not of his own making, finally gotten into operation the new electric plant, pulling Columbia out of the darkness into which it had been unwillingly plunged some three months earlier. The April 4th edition of the News observed that

"Much credit is due Mr. Ed Moss for the substantial manner in which the town is wired. He led the force of hands and certainly did a first-class job. We understand that Mr. Smith has employed Mr. Moss as his lineman, and in doing so we believe no mistake was made."

Those living outside the town limits also had an option for electrical power. A number of editions of the News that spring a century ago carried an ad for the Delco-Light, "complete electric plant -- the engine and dynamo in one compact unit" -- for farm or business-house use. (The ad also noted -- or at least implied -- the Delco-Light plant was in operaton at Mammoth Cave.) It could be fueled by gasoline, kerosene, or natural gas, and the price was $275 "complete with battery" or $325 "with large size battery," f.o.b. Dayton, Ohio. Interested parties could contact local agent A.H. Ballard of Columbia.


This story was posted on 2017-04-04 04:14:35
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The Adair Co. News advertised the Fairday washer 100 years ago



2017-04-04 - Columbia, KY - Photo from JIM.
This ad for a Fairday Twin Washer appeared in the Wednesday, April 4, 1917 edition of the Adair County News. (Note the name of the local agent shown in the image) This marvelous machine could be run either with electricity or with an engine powered by gasoline or other fuel. - JIM

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