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Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter IV

In this chapter, author Billy Joe Fudge travels '. . . travel to a place far, far away and a time we can only imagine by conjuring up photos from old text books, images produced by Hollywood moviemakers and those wisps of inspiration which flit from time to time across our mind's eye.'

Click on headline for complete Chapter IV with photo(s)
NEXT EARLIER CHAPTER: Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter III

By Billy Joe Fudge

From all accounts available to me, I can safely surmise that Lucy Clark Demumbrunn, my Great-Great Grandmother was a kinetic force of gracious acts of charity and community activism.

By the time her story is complete, I think it will be apparent to all that the genetic cloth from which she was cut would be the foundation of her strength of spirit, commitment to the well-being of others and dogged determination to never give up.


Additionally, Lucy Clark's faith in her Lord and Savior would have been the cement of the foundation she stood upon but her immediate family's Protestant religious fervor may very well have been the contributing factor to the "bump" in her most adventurous and intriguing heritage.

But for now, we will travel to a place far, far away and a time we can only imagine by conjuring up photos from old text books, images produced by Hollywood moviemakers and those wisps of inspiration which flit from time to time across our mind's eye. Wisps of inspiration which give us goose bumps and stimulate thoughts about the possibility that reincarnation might be more of a reality than our religious upbringings allow us to consider.

To begin our reconstruction of the family tree of Lucy Clark, we must journey back in time.

Back and back we travel to a time before Lewis and Clark, Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone.

Back and back to a time before the United States of America and the nation of Canada.

Back and back to a place across the Atlantic on the Continent of Europe to a village in the Perche Region of France and to the year of 1622.

It was in this year, the year of 1622 in the village of Lagny that Pierre Boucher (boo-shay) was born. Thus begins an incredible journey of religion, intrigue, adventure, royalty, discovery, debauchery, success, failure, hardship and family.

A family on a journey from the Perche of France. A journey which brought them to a new world. A new world that provided them opportunity to become integral players in the construction of two nations. A journey which carried them to Toria of Adair County, the heart of "The Great Wooded South". - Billy Joe Fudge

Reading the chapters going forward OR back to Chapter I to start from the beginning:
  1. Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter I
  2. Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter II
  3. Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter III
  4. Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter IV


This story was posted on 2017-01-01 05:26:14
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Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrun - Chapter IV



2017-01-01 - France - Photo submitted by Billy Joe Fudge.
Excerpt from latest installment of Lucy Clark Demumbrunn
- "It was in this year, the year of 1622 in the village of Lagny that Pierre Boucher (boo-shay) was born. Thus begins an incredible journey of religion, intrigue, adventure, royalty, discovery, debauchery, success, failure, hardship and family." - Billy Joe Fudge

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