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Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter II

My GGGrandmother along with her husband and my GGGrandfather, their family and all our forefathers back in the latter half of the 1800's were having to deal with climate change issues even more severe than now. I suspect that climate change has always been a phenomenon which mankind has had to learn to negotiate. - BILLY JOE FUDGE
Click on headline for complete Chapter II with photo(s)
NEXT EARLIER CHAPTER: Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter I

By Billy Joe Fudge

My Great Great Grandmother Lucy Clark Demumbrunn was born in 1850. That was the same year that most climatologists and historians consider to be the end of "The Little Ice Age".

The Little Ice Age was a, more or less, 300 year period of global cooling, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Although there were no glaciers approaching the Great Wooded South from the Artic Regions; essentially, our climate has been warming in jumps and starts, ever since.


My GGGrandmother along with her husband and my GGGrandfather, their family and all our forefathers back in the latter half of the 1800's were having to deal with climate change issues even more severe than now. I suspect that climate change has always been a phenomenon which mankind has had to learn to negotiate.

Lucy Clark recounted one such climatic or weather phenomenon from the year of 1881.

According to her, there was a deluge of rain on Thursday night, May 5th . In her words, "there came an awful big rain" which sounds very much like we might speak about it today.

Their farmland was located at Toria which is the watershed divide separating the Green River Watershed on the Western slope from the Cumberland River Watershed on the Eastern Slope.

In my mind's eye, looking back to that day, I can see Leatherwood Creek and England Branch running flush toward East Fork of the Little Barren River on its way to Green River on the West slope and Harrod's Fork of Crocus Creek on the East slope rushing down toward and past Elroy and Amandaville on its way to Cumberland River.

According to Lucy Clark, during the rest of May, and June and July and August and part of September there was not even enough rain to settle the dust. Needless to say, with the exception of the Winter wheat which matured after that big rain, there was a massive crop failure in the year of 1881. This meant that with no electricity, no Kroger, no IGA, Walmart and no garden to speak of that year, there was a shortage of food for both man and beast.

Until harvest time in 1882, about the only thing they had to eat were biscuit made from the successful crop of wheat and milk, butter and meat from the farm animals which they slaughtered. Lucy Clark got so tired of biscuit that she sifted out the bran from the ground wheat to make bran bread.

It was equally hard to raise a crop the following year since they had nothing to feed the horses, mules and oxen during the winter except wheat straw. The animals were so weak the following spring that they had to change them out more frequently than normal to allow them to rest.

Kentucky Color readers, be looking for following chapters of this story because you haven't seen the half of this historic, Demumbrunn Folktale yet! - BILLY JOE FUDGE

Reading the chapters going forward:
  1. Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter I
  2. Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter II
  3. Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter III


This story was posted on 2016-12-18 05:37:39
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Lucy Clark Demumbrunn & Family, circa 1905



2016-12-18 - Toria, Adair County, KY - Photo from collection of Billy Joe Fudge.
The woman in this picture is my Great Grandmother, Magdelene (Maggie) Delaney Roach Jessie. She is the mother of my Grandmother Emma who is standing by her and of course the daughter of Lucy Clark Demumbrunn and Nim Rod Roach. Ma was born in 1897 so I would suspect that this picture was taken around 1905. The gentleman is my Great Grandfather, John William Jessie and my Great Great Uncle Clarence, born in 1895 standing beside him. - Billy Joe Fudge

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Storm Sat 17 Dec 2016: Evergreen down Akin & Tutt Streets II



2016-12-18 - SE Corner, Akin & Tutt Streets, Columbia, KY - Photo by Ed Waggener, ColumbiaMagazine.com (c).
Columbia is a fraction less cheery with the loss of one of the largest living "Christmas Trees," the giant half-century plus old evergreen which stood on Tutt Street. The rootwad appears to be 13-15 feet in diameter. The tree was down Sat 17 Dec 2016, at around 11pmCT. The photo was taken Sunday morning. - EW

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