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Carol Perkins: Trust and consequences

The couple cleaned his house and cleaned him out! Being too trusting is a family trait. However, with every bad experience of trusting too much and assuming the best rather than the worse there will be dozens of good stories to combat the bad. The bad times, however, stick in the "craw." - CAROL PERKINS.
Next earlier Carol Perkins article: Karaoke at Sherrys, Hiseville, KY

By Carol Perkins

My brother, who lives in Oldham County, has been trying to make improvements in his home so he can sell it and move to San Diego where his adult children live. He has hired day laborers to lay floors, paint walls, and tear down fences. After they finished their work, he tried to find someone to clean up the house from top to bottom. He looked in the wrong place.

He had befriended a couple that frequently ate at a nearby restaurant. In their conversations, he told them he needed a cleaning crew to finish up the work. "Do you know anybody?" They quickly jumped at the chance to "help him out."


"They had the place looking good," he said. "I stayed out of their way and let them have the run of the house, and they sure made it look clean and straight. (He is not a housekeeper.) "I paid them and was happy with the results until...."

I knew what was probably coming. "The next day I went down the basement and saw that my fishing equipment was gone. Five or six expensive poles and my tackle box. I called the man. "You bring my fishing poles back right now!" He did some fast explaining how his son had taken them. His son was nowhere on the place. My brother should have pressed charges, but he was happy to have his poles back and had learned his "too trusting" nature had misled him once again.

"A few days later I discovered two of my shotguns were gone." He told me the kinds but that meant nothing to me. "I went straight to the local pawn shop and there they were. I told the owner to call the police and the police came right over."

He turned the man in for taking his guns but almost before my brother had a good night's sleep, the man was back on the streets. "I had to buy back my own guns," my brother said.

"What kind of world do we live in where someone can sell stolen property and the owner has to buy it back?" I was thinking as he told me this that he needed a good lawyer, but the lawyer would have cost more than the guns.

The couple cleaned his house and cleaned him out! Being too trusting is a family trait. However, with every bad experience of trusting too much and assuming the best rather than the worse there will be dozens of good stories to combat the bad. The bad times, however, stick in the "craw."


(My new book, A Girl Named Connie, is available at Blossoms Florist and Boutique Unique, 507 Happy Valley Road, Glasgow, KY 42141, Phone 270-629-3597; the Edmonton/Metcalfe Chamber of Commerce, 109 E Stockton Street, Edmonton, KY, Phone 270-432-3222; and the Lighthouse Restaurant, 1500 Sulphur Well/Knob Lick Road, Sulphur Well Historic District, KY 42129. Phone 270-629-3597. And Also on Amazon.com)

Contact: Carol Perkins, PO Box 134, Edmonton, KY 42129. Phone 670-432-5756. carolperkins06@gmail.com


This story was posted on 2016-11-26 06:20:19
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