ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 
























 
Louisville man charged with stealing USPS parcels from porches

Faces two counts of theft. 1) Hot Wheels Airbrush Auto Designer Kit. 2) Coat, blanket, and rug
The indictment of a person by a Grand Jury is an accusation only and that person is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

From U.S. Attorney's office
U.S. Department of Justice, Western District of Kentucky

LOUISVILLE, KY (21 Jan 2016) - A Louisville man was charged this week by federal grand jury indictment, with two counts of theft of United States Postal Service (USPS) parcels, which had been left for collection with other mail matter, on December 3, 2015, announced U.S. Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.


Joseph L. Carr, 48, is charged with stealing a Hot Wheels Airbrush Auto Designer Kit from mail left at a home on Larchmont Avenue in Louisville, and stealing a coat, blanket, and rug from mail at another home located on Larchmont Avenue.

According to an Affidavit attached to a Criminal Complaint, Carr was seen by construction workers carrying a package from a Larchmont Avenue home. The workers reported that the male (Carr) opened the package, removed the contents and placed the packaging in a trash can on the street. Carr was later stopped by Louisville Metro Police carrying a Kohl's merchandise bag, and consented to a search.

The Kohl's merchandise included a black Warm-Tek coat (still in plastic wrapping and bearing a $100.00 price tag), a Sonoma Lifestyle throw blanket (still in plastic wrapping and bearing a $44.99 price tag, and an Estate rug (still in plastic wrapping and bearing a $34.99 price tag). CARR also had a Hot Wheels Airbrush Auto Designer kit (still in box). An opened USPS Priority Mail box was recovered from the garbage can and was addressed to Larchmont Ave in Louisville, KY.

A year prior to Carr's arrest on these federal charges, Carr was arrested by LMPD for similar charges including multiple counts of mail theft and receiving stolen property which took place on December 4, 2014. According to those charges, several USPS customers had packages stolen from their residences. Several of the customers turned over surveillance videos from their homes showing a male, later identified as Carr, stealing packages. Carr was sentenced for those charges on December 14, 2015.

If convicted at trial, Carr could be sentenced to no more than five years in prison, fined $250,000 and be required to serve one year of supervised release. Carr is currently in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service.


This story was posted on 2016-01-25 08:10:26
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.


 

To sponsor news and features on ColumbiaMagazine, please use our contact form.

 

























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


 

ColumbiaMagazine.com content is available as an RSS/XML feed for your RSS reader or other news aggregator.
Use the following link: http://www.columbiamagazine.com/columbiamagazinerss.php.

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270-250-2730 Fax: 270-751-0401


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.