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A Christmas Rifle Story: The day the Devil won out, a little while

He knew he wasn't to shoot red birds, blue birds, robins and doves. But one day, hunting was bad and the Devil spotted a Dove and tempted him to shoot it. And the Devil's powerful sway won out for a while. The Devil said he could shoot the dove and no one will ever know. And the boy believed him! But after the dove plummeted to the ground, there was an incident between boy and dove which changed his life forever.
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By George Rice

After reading Ed's story and Joyce Coomer's comments on must do and must not of guns, I began to remember some of my precious times with a gun.

I was permitted to shoot a gun at a very early age while someone else stood by. And then the big moment came when I got a gun under the Christmas tree. But there were many restrictions with that gun.


The gun must always be pointed down or up. Never carry the gun on a level. The gun must never be brought in the house loaded and after every hunting safari, the gun was to be wiped with an oily rag and stood in the corner.

Now as Ed mentioned, there were certain birds that Must Not be shot. Those being red birds, blue birds, robins and doves. I respected those restrictions until one day hunting was not very good.

Now we know that the Lord worketh in mysterious ways and so does the devil. I was about to retreat from my hunting safari when the devil mentioned that there was a dove in the top of that great big tree, sitting there so peaceful and innocent and incidentally, that tree was a Thorn Tree.

Now that I'm older I can see the connection. The devil said you can shoot it and no one will ever know, and I believed him.

Sooo I take a careful aim and execute my excellent marksmanship. The gun fires and the bird comes fluttering to the ground. I go out a ways from the tree to inspect my kill when I discovered the bird was not dead. My marksmanship was not so perfect this time. I had broken the dove's wing - it was not dead.

Now it seems that the Lord was watching all of this and now He lowers the boom on me. I'm in bad trouble.

Now most people won't believe this but I saw a tear drop falling down that bird's face and those precious eyes I will never forget.

I'm standing there with my gun in my hand but I cannot shoot that bird again. Sooo what will I do? I can't fix the bird's wing and I can't shoot it again.

After a long look I notice the remains of an old fence rail. I pick up this old fence rail and heaved it high over my head, closed my eyes and whammed the ground. When I opened my eyes the bird was much dead to my relief.

I'm now glad to go to the house and put my gun away and to this day I have never shot another dove.

And I never told my Daddy what I did. - George Rice

Comments re article 72109 The Christmases when nobody got shot on Jamestown Hill


This story was posted on 2014-12-25 17:41:08
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