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Carol Perkins: A list of 'We would be better off, if's'

A Carol Perkins article which just wouldn't wait. Sunday with CM regular columnist Carol Perkins has written a list of wonderful advice on really coping in today's world, including a radical concept, for an educator, We would be better off if kids had no homework!. It's a summation of a realization that today's society is so busy being busy that that they can't really enjoy life, too busy being efficient that they can't be effective
Next earlier Carol Perkins column: Carol Perkins: Getting ready for The Pumpkin Festival Posted September 28 2014

As I see it - We would be better off never listening to the news
We would all be better off never listening to the news. Stay in the dark about world events, tragedies, kidnappings, murders, beheadings, tortures, hurricanes, tornadoes, and abusers. Pretend we are Fred and Wilma. When world events are discussed in our presence, just nod as if we understand. Live in the city of Denial. Life is good there.


As I see it - We would be better off never listening to the news
We would all be better off not wasting our money on most movies because they are boring, vulgar, and plotless (without a plot). I love movies and always have. The Beach Party movies with Frankie and Annette were priceless. “The Godfather” was one of a kind. Nothing compares to “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Where have all the good movies gone (same place as the flowers)? The answer is blowing in the wind. The last good movie I saw was… I’m thinking. It was…. Right now I can’t think of any I would recommend. I looked forward to “The Giver” but it was far from as good as the book. As I see it, Hollywood assumes the majority of us curse with precision, drink and smoke daily, sleep around, and kill for pleasure.

As I see it - We would be better if people had solid work ethics
We would all be better off if young people had solid work ethics. Most young people have none! Don’t feel like working? Call in with a headache but make sure it is right before your shift is to start so you can cause someone who wasn’t planning to work feel obligated to take your place. When the boss is not looking, how many young people are texting? On Facebook? How many of them stand around twiddling their thumbs waiting to be told what to do? The idea of giving an extra touch to a job is lost on most of the young. Cleaning up behind them is an imposition. If two young people are working, most often one will put the work off on the other yet be paid the same.

As I see it - We would be better if kids had no homework!
We would all be better off if kids had no homework! I have harped on this before, but I still hold forth on why punish a child and his parents with homework? Students have 175 days of school and are there 6 hrs.30 minutes. Parents have worked eight hour shifts and the last thing they want to do is argue over homework. It becomes WAR in elementary school and by the time a student gets to middle school, he usually just ignores the assignments and tells his parents he has nothing to do. Far too many projects are done by parents. My grandson brought home his project which he had obviously done. I was glad Carla didn’t do it for him but I also knew it would not stack up as for his grade to the outlandish creations of some of his classmates (and it didn’t). “You should have seen some of the projects these parents did,” Carla said. The cheater is rewarded. I remember one time a parent asking her son what “she” made on his paper she wrote and then laughed about it.
One of my high school friends always did her homework and she knew each morning that two or three students would be waiting to copy it. I asked her recently, “Why did you give it to them?” Of course, she said she didn’t want to make them upset. So as I see it, homework is seldom meaningful and seldom done by the student.

As I see it - We would be better if we would reduce our needs
We would all be better off if we could reduce our needs, pay more attention to people rather than things, and find something that makes up happy each day. Turning off the news won’t make it go away. Movies are bad because tickets to bad movies sell. Young people will have good work ethics if adults teach them what they need to know. Cheaters somehow get ahead of the rest of us, but we have a hope they will have their day and they usually do.

As I see it - We would be better if people lived like Henry David Thoreau
We would all be better off if we made an attempt to live like Henry David Thoreau instead of Donald Trump. That’s not going to happen! Carol Perkins

Carol Perkins, the columnist, is an author, retired teacher, and owner operator of Main Street Screen Printing in Edmonton. She is also the co-host, with Lindsey Wilson Graduate Susan Shirley Chambers, of the popular live call in show, Susan & Carol, Unscripted heard on Tuesdays at 10amCT, on the Hoss 99.1 FM radio


This story was posted on 2014-10-02 05:52:05
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