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JIM: Burkesville Street mystery item an early arc lamp

Fixture ' micro-glimpse of Columbia's first endeavor with electricty." Research into archives of almost 110 years ago uncovers a bit of history of the (W.R.) Myers & Sons firm, an early distributor of electric power in Columbia,
Comments re photo 55374 A mystery item in Old Burkesville Street photo By JIM

The following gives a micro-glimpse of Columbias first endeavor with electricty. The last sentence od the second paragrpah seems to offer a clue regarding the "mystery item" in the Burkesville Street photo.

In early December, 1904, the Myers Brothers-the firm was later called (W.R.) Myers & Sons - purchased the franchise to install an electric light plant in Columbia, one "capable of producing 150 incandescent lights of 16 candle power, provided that the people of the town would contract for 100 of them." Shortly thereafter, the town council entered into contract with the Myers Brothers, the latter to provide power for "eight arc lights, four upon the square and one out each street."


By the middle of June 1905, the street lights were in operation. Stated the June 14 edition of the News, "Columbia now has electric lights...[While only eight arc lights dispel the darkness at present, it is only a question of short time when more will be strung."

A few weeks later, the News noted that "The four arc lights on the square make it as bright as day, and a great deal of shopping is done after supper. A number of residents here had their residences wired and many others will follow suit." (Some of the first residences and business houses wired included the Masonic hall, the Christian Church chapel, the Marcum Hotel (later known as the Miller Hotel and the New Adair), Walker, the Morrison, & Co. mill, and Mrs. Cordie Rosenfield's residence. --Jim


This story was posted on 2014-06-12 19:13:04
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