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Kentucky Color - More than an Old Fence

The Line Fence: "We Country Folk tend to simplify things by taking them down to the lowest common denominator and farm identification of this nature is a prime example . . . They are, in my opinion, indicative of how carefully the generations before us chose the best materials and built things with the idea of permanence in mind. Maybe we should take a hint from them and seek to become less of a "disposable' and 'temporal' people." - BILLY JOE FUDGE
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By Billy Joe Fudge

The accompanying photo shows a property line fence between the Rudolph Bragg place and the Wilbert Stotts place two miles out Harvey's Ridge. The names are of the folks that owned the farms while I was growing up and is how my parents generation identified these farms.


We Country Folk tend to simplify things by taking them down to the lowest common denominator and farm identification of this nature is a prime example.

Wilbert Stotts, my Grandpa, my Mother's Father, was the oldest of 17 children and was a working man of the highest degree. Of course a lot of folks from his generation would fit into that category. He carved off a many a chew of salt cured ham for me, much to the chagrin of my Mother, who was fearful of trichinosis. Pa Stotts assured her that no worm or egg could survive the brine curing process and so far his prognostication has proven correct.

This is more than an old fence to me because my Pa Stotts most likely erected this fence sometime prior to his passing in 1959. The large fencing staples, woven wire and American Chestnut fence post have weathered considerably, but have endured for more than 50 years.

They are, in my opinion, indicative of how carefully the generations before us chose the best materials and built things with the idea of permanence in mind. Maybe we should take a hint from them and seek to become less of a "disposable" and "temporal" people. - Billy Joe Fudge, the writer, is a Retired District Forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry and a favorite naturalist and civic leader South Central Kentucky.


This story was posted on 2014-02-04 03:28:24
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Kentucky Color - More than an old fence



2014-02-04 - Harveys Ridge, S Adair County, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester, KY State Division of Forestry. We Country Folk tend to simplify things by taking them down to the lowest common denominator and farm indentification of this nature is a prime example. This is a property line fence between the Rudolph Bragg place and the Wilbert Stotts place two miles out Harvey's Ridge. The names are of the folks that owned the farms while I was growing up and is how my parents generation identified these farms. - Billy Joe Fudge
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