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Carol Perkins: Working with Santa Claus

'In Santa's world, the homes are warm and cozy with nothing but the flicker of candle light glowing in the windows. I might prefer electric candles, but the warmth and the flickering I would embrace. In reality, the season isn't a scene straight out of "The Night Before Christmas." It either brings out the best in people or the worst.' - CAROL PERKINS
The next earlier Carol Perkins column: Carol Perkins: O Christmas tree, you'll be the death of me

By Carol Perkins

Living at the North Pole and working in Santa's workshop appealed to me as a child. As a matter of fact, it appeals to me now. I like what I've seen on the pages of Christmas storybooks and in movies such as "White Christmas." The snow covered town where the moon is so bright there is no need for street lights, and the shuffling of elves back and forth from one shop to the other in a rush to complete orders-perfect. I know how to rush so I would fit right in this town.


I love how nice and sweet Mrs. Claus always is. Never ruffling a feather or whining or complaining. The consistently jolly Santa finds delight in her cookies and his work is never boring, tiresome, or unappreciated. Living in Santa's world would be heavenly.

In Santa's world, the homes are warm and cozy with nothing but the flicker of candle light glowing in the windows. I might prefer electric candles, but the warmth and the flickering I would embrace.

In reality, the season isn't a scene straight out of "The Night Before Christmas." It either brings out the best in people or the worst. When I was a child, Christmastime was always the happiest because everyone around me was happy. My parents made Christmas extra special and so did my other relatives. Except for the city cousins jumping on my grandmother's bed (we knew better), there was very little drama at family gatherings. The entire season was one of smiles. I know that is not true in some homes.

For instead, I have come to the conclusion just from listening and observing that not only do family gatherings turn into tense moments when sister Sue and sister Joan, who don't like each other 364 days, try to act as if they do on the one day of the year they are in the same room, but someone will be sure to needle one of them until the fireworks fly over the mashed potatoes. Forced family gatherings will crush the spirit as fast as a Christmas tree on fire.

Some daddies (or mamas) have too much spirit on Christmas Eve and land under the Christmas tree. "Please Daddy, Don't Get Drunk This Christmas" was written by someone who had obviously dragged his daddy from under the tree. Kids may not remember anything else about Christmas but they will never forget that Daddy or Mama drank too much and made a fool out of himself.

The spirit of Christmas in Santa's world lasts all year long. Wouldn't that be a jolly way to live? - Carol Perkins


This story was posted on 2013-12-15 17:26:28
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