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Kentucky Color: Farmers Wreath

Kentucky Color: Farmers Wreath Click on headline for full essay with photo(s)

By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

I came upon the "Farmers Wreath" in the accompanying photo, recently, while exploring in the far reaches of the Great Wooded South. This wreath is constructed from barbed wire but not just your run of the mill barbed wire. The barbed wire used in this wreath is known around these parts as Japanese barbed wire.


Regular, humane barbed wire is primarily manufactured in the United States. It is pliable, not stiff, and somewhat soft when compared to its Japanese counterpart. It is biodegradable, in other words it will rust and deteriorate over time and is used by compassionate farmers who would like to use plank or woven wire fencing but just can't afford it.

Japanese barbed wire has been in use in the Great Wooded South for about 50 years. It is constructed of a secret formula, high tech metal alloy. Whole sections of this evil menace to livestock, wildlife and mankind have been discovered coiled up on the ground in the same spectacular condition it would have been on the store shelf 50 years earlier. Yes, it is indeed nearly indestructible.

The barbs are sharpened to a razor's edge and some who have suffered near fatal attacks from Japanese barbed wire say that they were standing several paces away when they would suddenly be overcome by the wire. I know it sounds impossible but years of extensive research in secret, Great Wooded South laboratories have determined that the metal has a memory and will seek to recoil into the original shape of the roll as soon as tension is released which often happens when a wire will break.

Furthermore, recent declassified documents reveal that the wire was banned by the Geneva Conventions as an impoundment material for prison camps, prisons and the like. Since Japanese barbed wire was banned, the more humane razor-wire has become a less than adequate substitute. Billy Joe Fudge, Vice-president, Homeplace on Green River, Inc., Retired District Forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry 270-250-2239


This story was posted on 2012-09-29 08:58:42
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Kentucky Color: Farmers Wreath



2012-09-29 - Adair County, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester, KY State Division of Forestry.
I came upon this "Farmers Wreath" recently while exploring in the far reaches of the Great Wooded South. This wreath is constructed from barbed wire but not just your run of the mill barbed wire. The barbed wire used in this wreath is known around these parts as Japanese barbed wire. Regular, American barbed wire is more humane, more eco-friendly. - Billy Joe Fudge

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