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Kentucky Color - False Solomon's Seal

For many, this time in September is the most beautiful season of the year in Adair County, KY. With briliiant fall colors of yellow and orange everywhere, and for those who see a bit more, stunning decorations of berries. One who knows this season is fleeting, to be captured or be easily forgotten, is nature essayist Billy Joe Fudge, with insight on a common but not so famous natural resource: Little False Solomon's Seal
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By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester
Kentucky Department of Forestry

There are actually two plants that are called False Solomon's Seal.

One is also called False Spikenard and is larger than this one which is sometime referred to as Little False Solomon's Seal. At any rate they are beautiful plants.


These particular Little False Solomon's Seal, I dug up about 15 years ago and planted in my Forest Wildflower Garden. As you can tell by the needles the Garden is located beneath my 50+ year old Loblolly Pine trees.

The berries start out striped and splotchy and then turn to a brilliant red.

Little False Solomon's Seal is said to be a strong laxative. To me that means that it is poison. Well you know what "they" say, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so, maybe laxatives also have varying hues of attractiveness depending upon. - Billy Joe Fudge


This story was posted on 2012-09-11 04:25:31
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Kentucky Color - False Solomon's Seal



2012-09-11 - Green Hills, Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester, KY State Division of Forestry.
The berries of Little False Solomon's Seal are bright red now, after starting out a splotchy color. This one is in Billy Joe Fudge's Forest Wildflower Garden at his home. The plant was dug up 15 years ago and transplanted and is thriving now under Mr. Fudge's 50+ year old Loblolly Pine.

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Kentucky Color: Little False Solomon berries - splotchy stage



2012-09-11 - Greenhills Road, Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester, KY State Division of Forestry.
The fall berries of the Little False Solomon's Seal start out in a red and white splotchy pattern, above Later, the berries will turn a brilliant red. These are part of Billy Joe Fudge's Forest Wildflower Garden.

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