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Kentucky Color: Blackberries and Bears

Evidence left by bear in South ADAIR County places its weight at 119 pounds, Billy Joe Fudge and unnamed associate agree. Bear Pile also yielded evidence that Bear had been consuming vast amounts of the the county's finest blackberries. This paper adds a new dimension to telling what size animals are - beyond Dr. Neat, beyond telekinemensuration (weighing moving animal from moving car, already perfected by BJF - to knowing bear weights by size of bear leavings

By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

The Blackberry seeds in a bear pile found this past week in Southern Adair County make pretty convincing evidence that Black Bear are avid berry pickers.

After close examination, visual that is, the landowner and your humble Kentucky Color member of the Blue Ribbon Bear Board estimate the size of the bear which made this deposit to be 119 pounds.


Some prior research by the landowner concerning a much larger bear pile found some time ago and the estimated size of bear that have been seen in the area were integral factors in the calculation.

This evidence was found in the yard of a southern Adair County resident who will remain anonymous for the reason of privacy. He is concerned that the paparazzi might camp out in front of his home making his life un-bear-able, if you know what I mean.

At any rate for those who are seeking to prove the existence of bear in the Great Wooded South this is just one more bit of evidence to put on the pile, so to speak.

Doubters are already seeking to discredit this load of evidence with suggestions that this mass might have been produced by a fox or coyote. All I can say to that is that in all of recorded history no one has ever reported seeing a 119 pound fox or coyote.

Oh well, the life of a Great Wooded South researcher is never boring and, oh so rewarding at times. - Billy Joe Fudge


This story was posted on 2012-07-08 03:20:43
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Kentucky Color: Valley of the Bear



2012-07-08 - Somewhere in South Adair County, KY - Photo by BJ Fudge, Pen, CM. Bear Board Member B.J. Fudge isn't saying exactly where he discovered the evidence (lower right photo, somewhat smallened to protect the squeamish) of the 119 lb, blackberry eating bear, but a few will recognize the view of greater Inroad from Insurance Hill (large photo). Well, it is somewhere in there. The upper photo is from the Downtown Inroad Bridge over Crocus Creek. The middle right photo is of an earlier photo by BJ Fudge, showing a bear in Crocus Creek Bottom.
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