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ACHS Students find art in non-conventional places

Winners at Scholastic Art Show: Ashley Brown, Megan Coomer, Leslie Wolford, Elizabeth Caldwell, Alexandra Morgan, and .Brandy Parson. Ashley Brown qualifies for national competition
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By April Shepperd

It was a day of fast cars and fine art for several Adair County High School students as they explored artistic beauty and expression on various levels at the Scholastic Art Show and National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green.

Prominent arts students of Debra Wimmer teamed up with the Lifeskills students of Beverly England on February 23, 2012, and traveled to Bowling Green to view both exhibits. The teacher's goal was to expand their student's artistic recognition of the world around them.


Students who were recognized for their talents during this year's show were:
  • Gold Key - Ashley Brown for her ceramics and glass piece "Eruption"
  • Silver Key - Meagan Coomer for her photograph entitled "Wintering Birds"
  • Honorable Mention - Leslie Wolford for her ceramics and glass piece "Watching"
  • Honorable Mention - Elizabeth Caldwell for her ceramics and glass piece "Aphrodite"
  • Honorable Mention - Alexandra Morgan for her photograph entitled "Kentucky Morning"
  • Honorable Mention - Courtney Janes for her ceramics and glass piece "Curly"
  • Honorable Mention - Brandy Parson for her ceramics and glass piece "Moe"
  • Honorable Mention - Alexandra Morgan for her photograph entitled "The Road to Nowhere"
  • Honorable Mention - Meagan Coomer for her photographic self-portrait "Through My Eyes"
The Corvette Museum doesn't seem like the place art connoisseurs would visit to study the principles of art, but scientific engineering and aerodynamics are not the only disciplines involved in car production. The construction process of producing Corvettes includes the art mediums of painting, graphic arts, sculpture and design. After watching a film depicting the sports car's history, the students meandered through the museum viewing various cars in settings depicting the era in which they were made. Like other forms of art, the design and styles of the vehicles have evolved over time.

"The designers start off with just an idea, like in art, and move on using their own creativity until they are happy with the piece," said Ashley Brown, a four-year art student, who appreciated the cleaner lines of the older cars. "They use the same techniques we do, just for a different purpose."

In a more traditional setting, the Scholastic Art Show, sponsored by the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, offered the students a chance to examine various forms of fine art including painting, sculpture, ceramics, drawing, graphic design, multi-media and photography. The program identifies regional teens with exceptional artistic talents and showcases their work each year in an exhibit at the Capital Arts Alliance. The awards are the longest-running, most prestigious recognition program for creative teens in the U.S.

This year, five juried students from ACHS were recognized for their talents and had eight pieces of their work on display at the exhibit. Those awarded Gold Keys will advance to the National Competition.

Viewing work by fellow students can be inspirational and allow art students to expand and enhance their own personal talents. It offers students the chance to contemplate what other artists envision and examine how they express their idea in a medium.

"When you see work this good, it really encourages you to try harder - to do more," said Brandy Parson, senior art student. "It challenges you as an artist. Personally, I see that I have the ability to do more. This has made me think about the possibilities of where my art can go." - April Shepperd


This story was posted on 2012-03-13 14:41:48
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Art Students at Bowling Green, KY, outing



2012-03-13 - Bowling Green, KY - Photo by April Shepperd.
Art students attending the Bowling Green, KY outing were: Emmalee Baker, Angela Barker, Ashley Brown, Elizabeth Caldwell, Carrissa Carter, David Carter, Meagan Coomer, Barkley Edwards, Jacob Estes, Sarah Hadley, James Howard, Courtney Janes, Elizabeth McGaha, Alex Morgan, Tiffany Morgan, Chelsea Nowlin, Jordan Parnell, Brandy Parson, Emily Peck, Jonathan Preston, Alexa Quiroz, Travis Richards, Hunter Rich, Bailey Shepperd, Randy Streeval, Josh Warf, Miranda Wright and Canaan Williams. Chaperones are Beverly England and Treva Cowan.

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