ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 

























 
100 Years ago, from June 14, 2011:

There was none of this stuff of bankers turning down loan applicants while wearing golf shirts or lascivious behavior of women showing bare skin below the neck and navels. Nosirree! They had decorum and proper dress in those days, instilled through advice in the News and, no doubt, from other pulpits. There was this tip for young ladies: Keep your pins straight and stick them securely. An underskirt showing below the top skirt, looks tackey.. This and more gleaned by "Jim" from the News of three days shy of 100 years ago
Click on headline for all of revelations and discoveries from 100 years ago, plus pictorial provenance

By "Jim"

100 years ago: Short news and business items found in the June 14, 1911 Adair County News.

Mr. Albia Eubank, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.F. [Sam and Hattie] Eubank, has accepted a position with the Paull Drug Co. He is a very capable and industrious young man....



In June, 1911, young Eubank had turned 16 or 17 in April (records vary) and had been graduated from the High School department of the Columbia Graded School just weeks earlier. In 1917, Mr. Eubank answered his country's call to the colors. Shortly after the war, he removed to Louisville, where he resided until his passing in 1971.

Mr. J. Cager Yates, who is largely interested in the manufacture and sale of overalls, was in Columbia last week and called to see the merchants of town.

The article went on to state that the business concern Mr. Yates represented, the Buckskin Overall Co., had recently removed from Bradfordsville, Marion County, to Lewisburg, Logan County, "on account of railroad facilities and other advantages." (One must wonder if the "other advantages" included tax breaks...)

Front page advice for the ladies: Keep your pins straight and stick them securely. An underskirt showing below the top skirt, looks tackey.

Mrs. Emerline Collins (see under "Romance, Interrupted") of Dallas, Texas, offered for sale "44 acres of land...being part of the John L. Lapsley farm, lying on the north side of the Jamestown and Columbia road, about one and one-fourth mile west of Esto, Ky."

The Lapsley property was in Russell County, near modern-day Hwy 92, just east of the old Liberty Church building and within the morally uplifting sphere of Montpelier.

Buggies at Reduced Prices -- We offer our entire stock of Buggies at Greatly Reduced Prices. Why not look them over and let us rock you light and easy. Reed Hardware Company, Columbia, Ky.

In the Crocus newsletter: Mr. B.S. Miller has rolled his old dwelling place, and is replacing it with a new one, which will be the nicest building in town.

(The September 6, 1911 Crocus newsletter noted that the house was nearing completion, and that when finished, it would be "the most modern and elegant country residence in this part of the state, and the character of work being done speaks well for the designer and constructor, Mr. Claude Miller." A later edition stated that the house "is a modern plan and will have all conveniences." A photo of this magnificent still-standing home appears at Scenic Adair County: Crocus, KY.)

Great Bargains -- We have just returned from Market where we purchased a Wholesale Dealer's entire stock of Sample Summer Shoes and Slippers at Reduced Prices...We also purchased a lot of Men's Clothing which we will sell as Low as the Lowest...You can save at least 20% by dealing with us. We also give a nice Cobler Seated Rocker with every $25 purchase. Patteson & Denney.

The firm of Patteson & Denney -- J.F. "Jo" Patteson and S.G. Denney -- was the successor to the firm of Coffey & Patteson, the former gentleman, J.N. "Newt" Coffey (Mr. Patteson's father-in-law), having sold his interest in the business to Mr. Denney in the closing days of 1910. Later ads in the News referred to the rocking chairs as "Cobblers."

Watch maker and Jeweler [and] Optician. My work is Guaranteed to Give Perfect Satisfaction. Office in J.N. Page's Drug Store. S.N. Hancock.

"T.A. Smith, Dentist, Columbia, Ky. Office in Russell Building."

Dr. Smith, a native of Russell County and former resident of Columbia, had returned to Columbia to practice just few weeks earlier. He had attended a course of study at the Ohio School of Dental Surgery in 1903-04 and had practiced in Monticello since that time.

Horace Walker has opened a tin shop on Burkesville street and is prepared to do roofing, guttering, or any other tin work.

An earlier tinner, Mr. L.V. Hall, blew into Columbia in the closing days of 1899. He stayed about 11 years, selling his tinner's tools to L.W. Bennett and Elmore Strange in the late winter of 1911.

Mr. J.T. Barbee, Sr., started on a several month's journey visiting Elizabethtown, and point in Larue County last Thursday at 10 a.m. He returned Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock. He went as far as Campbellsville where he abandoned his journey.

'Compiled by "Jim"


This story was posted on 2011-06-12 08:32:01
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.


To sponsor news and features on ColumbiaMagazine, please use our contact form.

Built 100 years ago: Miller house at Crocus



2011-06-12 - Photo by Linda Waggener.
Jim writes: The September 6, 1911 Crocus newsletter noted that the house was nearing completion, and that when finished, it would be "the most modern and elegant country residence in this part of the state, and the character of work being done speaks well for the designer and constructor, Mr. Claude Miller." A later edition stated that the house "is a modern plan and will have all conveniences." The CM file photo above was taken in January of 2006, by Linda Waggener: the caption then read: "Considered by many as the most beautiful homes in Adair County and by everyone as one of the most beautiful homes, here, was this residence which dominates downtown Crocus, KY. Cyrus found this Quote du Jour from a long-time resident of the home and a beloved Lindsey Wilson College teacher, Edith Spickard, who had this to say, in 1971, about Crocus (MAP: Crocus, KY): "Crocus is the kind of community in which all Kentuckians should be privileged to live." It is a beautiful community, a few miles south of Glens Fork, quietly located off busy KY 55. Crocus is about one-half mile off KY 55 on the road to Bryan and Creelsboro. A sign in the yard of the home still says, "Crocus, population 16, and growing."

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



 























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


 

ColumbiaMagazine.com content is available as an RSS/XML feed for your RSS reader or other news aggregator.
Use the following link: http://www.columbiamagazine.com/columbiamagazinerss.php.

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270-250-2730 Fax: 270-751-0401


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.