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Kentucky Color: Ice Trees

'Sunrise and dawn are two different phenomena. Dawn is the same for folks on the same longitude, but sunrise has topographical considerations
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By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

The hills are aglow, was the thought that came to mind as I sat astraddle the Adair/Cumberland County line on Hwy 704. My view was to the East of the confluence of Sand Lick Branch and Crocus Creek in the early morning looking up Box House Hill toward Wolf Creek Dam.


Day had dawned over two hours earlier and the South Central Kentucky landscape was glistening everywhere because of frost and frozen moisture that had accumulated overnight on everything above ground. This particular location is between Cumberland River and Crocus Creek and as usual there was more moisture available and there was an even thicker ice coating on everything.

Sunrise and dawn are two different phenomena. Dawn is morning twilight and is that period of time between night and sunrise. Dawn is at more or less the same time for folks on the same longitude. However, sunrise is relative to one's location topographically. Those who live on higher ground will see the sun rise at an earlier time than those who live in the valleys.

Incidentally and historically, those in defensive land positions during wartime are most vulnerable to attack just after the "break of dawn". Individuals are lured into a false sense of security because of the line of eastern light that divides earth from sky. They fail to realize that "Break of Dawn" is followed by a short time of darkness prior to actual morning twilight where one can begin to discern nearby objects.

The news earlier Kentucky Color: Old Man Winter, a poem


This story was posted on 2011-01-11 05:35:22
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Kentucky Color: Ice Trees



2011-01-11 . Photo by Billy Joe Fudge
The hills are aglow," Billy Joe Fudge writes, "was the thought that came to mind as I sat astraddle the Adair/Cumberland County line on Hwy 704. My view was to the East of the confluence of Sand Lick Branch and Crocus Creek in the early morning looking up Box House Hill toward Wolf Creek Dam."

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