ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 
































 
Billy Joe Fudge, the tree man, thinks right

Adair County Printing Company CEO thinks Billy Joe Fudge has rational outlook on trees, but can't say the same for some so-called Green Thinkers and impractical Tree Huggers.
About, Kentucky Color: Giants Among Us. Fairgrounds Oaks

By Ralph R. Waggener

The article about the life and death of trees was put very well.

Most so called tree huggers misunderstand the process of the life of a tree. Tree farming is very important to our environment just as the harvesting and replanting process helps control carbon.




I understand that young growth trees collect carbon much better than old growth trees. Of course we all like the looks of big trees and trees that are grown just for beauty and shade are usually found in yards.

Tree harvesting from our forest is very important. We need the lumber and the little that is used to make paper and other products is helping make good use of the whole tree.

The replanting helps the environment because the younger growth trees help capture more carbon than the trees that were cut down.

It also helps when people understand exactly what they want to protect before they go on a crusade. We have been on a crusade in this country to stop using paper, and that well and good but what we replace it with some times can be more hurtful and more expensive than the use of paper.

Laser printers use more electricity, develop more heat

Laser printers use way more electricity and develop way more heat than any printing press could ever use.

The U.S. Post Office is losing money because we are using the internet more.

You would think that the Postmaster General would understand that the answer is not raising postal rates and writing more rules for the companies and people who still use their services.

You would think that the best way for the Post Office would try to get the business of places like Amazon wgucg are shipping to private residents where Fed X and UPS don't really want to go to.

You would think that the Post Office would let its customers decide what size and weight of a box would suit their needs instead of picking the size of a box we can use.

Post Office policies are hurting printing industry

The reason of the attack on the post office is that we run a printing company - a part of one of Adair County's biggest industries - and I really think that a lot of supposedly Green Thinking a living. And a lot of misinformed i>Green Thinking has wrongly attacked the printing business, which has cost my company - and other Adair County printing companies - business.

Yes, lets think Green. That's a good thing.

This idea: Don't use paper and save a tree, is is just simply wrongheaded!

Thank you, Billy Joe, for being someone to finally say I'm right about trees.

I really appreciates the way you put this. -s/Ralph R Waggener


This story was posted on 2010-08-08 13:34:37
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.



 






























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


Looking for a story or picture?
Try our Photo Archive or our Stories Archive for all the information that's appeared on ColumbiaMagazine.com.

 

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270.403.0017


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.