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Kentucky Color - Fog Pearls

Natural work of arachnids is emulated by man to provide potable water some places
For next earlier Kentucky Color, see Kentucky Color: Watch the ball

By Billy Joe Fudge
Retired District Forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry

A scene one might be more likely to see in August rather than March but nevertheless this is the most impressive string of Fog Pearls, in the accompanying photo, I can remember seeing.

Late July and August is typically the busiest time of year for spider web building and of course August is renown for its heavy early morning fogs. In fact the "Old Folks Weather Prognosticators" used the number of fogs in August to predict the number of winter snows.

I am sure that this spider web did not survive the winter and therefore was constructed during a recent warm day by an enterprising early riser in an attempt to snag a late winter meal.

The fog pearls at the intersections of the web were particularly large and impressive.

Large man-made spider webs are used by several communities with very little rainfall in Southwestern European and Mediterranean Sea coastal areas to harvest evening and early morning ocean fogs to provide potable water for their municipalities.



This story was posted on 2010-04-01 07:20:36
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Kentucky Color - Finest string of Fog Pearls



2010-04-01 - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, retired District Forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry. Adair Co., KY
This spider web has the finest set of Fog Pearls the photographer says he's ever seen. The beautiful engineering work has been copied on a huge scale, he notes in the accompanying article, to provide potable water in some dry coastal regions.

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