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Kentucky Color: Citizen's Park III, Tree Killers

Earlier on CM:
By Billy Joe Fudge

We usually think of tree killers as men harvesting trees with chain saws, men with heavy equipment clearing land and all kinds of disease and insect infestations. However, each and every one of us can be complicit in the killing of trees by simply doing nothing.

As referenced in Citizen's Park II, clear and present threats to the health of our urban forests and in some areas, our forestlands themselves, come when vines attack. The particular threat to our urban forest, the trees in our yards, the trees along streets and roadways, and in public spaces as in our Citizen's Park comes most often in the form of invasive species.


Invasive species are nothing more than plants that we homeowners have planted in our yards over the years. Winter creeper (Euonymus) arrived in the US in the early 1900's from China. Others, such as English ivy, the evergreen vines seen on this tree trunk, arrived in the US in the early 1700's. The evergreen vines growing up the tree trunks all the way into the tree tops is both English ivy and Winter creeper. Unlike our native vines, neither of these invasives has any redeeming qualities.

Our native Grapevine, Virginia creeper, and Poison ivy are deciduous and play important roles in our natural ecosystem. Many songbirds, squirrels, deer, etc will eat the grapes and berries during the year, especially in late winter. However, Poison ivy and Virginia creeper do attach themselves to the bark of trees as you can see on the right side of this tree trunk. This attachment can damage yard trees and trees in public spaces and can be easily controlled by cutting and removing a 4 inch piece of the vine down close to the ground which will kill the vine going up the tree. As the vines regrow they can easily be cut to prevent reattachment to the tree. Remember, Poison ivy is still poisonous during the winter months, so use caution when working on these vines.


This story was posted on 2023-12-02 13:36:02
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Kentucky Color: Citizen's Park III, Tree Killers



2023-12-02 - Adair Co., KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
As referenced in Citizen's Park II, clear and present threats to the health of our urban forests and in some areas, our forestlands themselves, come when vines attack.

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Kentucky Color: Vines can damage trees



2023-12-02 - Adair Co., KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
English ivy and Virginia creeper do attach themselves to the bark of trees, as you can see with this huge Poison ivy vine on the right side of this tree trunk. The green leaves are actually the invasive, English ivy. This attachment can damage yard trees and trees in public spaces.

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



 
































 
 
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