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Safety tips provided for using all types of grills

Summer is grill-outdoors time. Millions of people grill out on holidays and some grill all year round, but take care to handle grills safely.

The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA), U.S. fire departments report an average of 10 deaths and 160 injuries occur annually, causing $149 million in direct property damage. Four out of six home fires caused by grills were caused by gas in the most recent data, while 12 percent were caused by charcoal or another solid fuel. One of the key reasons for gas grill fires was leaks. Safety tips for grilling follow:



* Always take the gas grill outside in the open to check for gas leaks. Make sure the grill is at least four or five feet away from the house. Get some soapy water in a spray bottle and spray on the connections. If bubbles appear, you have a gas leak. Fix the connections before you turn on the gas.

* Checking for leaks is essential. In one case reported by the NFPA, a 48-year-old woman suffered burns to her face and hair when the gas line disconnected.

* Always lift the lid to light the grill. If you turn the knobs on the gas grill while the lid is closed, gas can accumulate and ignite.

* If you turn on the knobs and your gas grill doesn't immediately light, then turn off the gas and wait two or three minutes. This allows the gas to dissipate. According to NFPA, this happened to a 32-year-old man who suffered burns to his face and arms when, at first, a gas grill did not ignite, but then it burst into flames.

It's not just gas grills that cause fires, either. That little hibachi or small charcoal grill can be very dangerous if not monitored.

* Never use gasoline to light a grill.

* Always tend a grill. About 29 percent of structure fires occur when a grill is used on an balcony or terrace and not watched.

* Make sure it is out of the traffic area. According to the NFPA, thermal burns from grills are not uncommon when children or adults run into them while running or playing.


This story was posted on 2022-08-04 13:24:53
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