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The Fox Chase Trio of Adair County

By Col. Carlis B. Wilson

There are many things remembered in the days of childhood. One such memory for me is the three men that loved to fox hunt in Adair County, Kentucky. They owned a special breed of dogs that loved to chase foxes. The sly red fox seemed to be their favourite.

Kentucky's Oldest Sport
Little did I knowthat Fox Hunting was one of Kentucky's oldest sports. However I should have known it was not just these three men that loved the outdoors and fresh air, the smell of campfire, hot boiling coffee, the melody of the pack of dogs chasing the fox. As for those dogs I do not know if they were strains of Walker, Trigg or Goodman, but I do know that they were expensive dogs. Some cost $75.00 to 100.00 dollars in the days when men worked for $2.00-$4.00 dollars a day. These men took good care of their dogs, for they must be able to lead the pack, when old red was chased.

Ready To Show Their Dogs!
I remember one of these fox hunts in the late forties. We loaded the dogs and some food and headed out to meet the other two men with their company of men and boys. Each one of these men was ready to show what their dogs could do. When we got to the best place in the county for such a chase, the campfire was built, the coffee-pot placed on the fire. The dogs gave somewhat of a signal that they were on the trail of the nights entertainment. As the chase got under way the sound of chatter from each group talking and telling their tales, one could hear one of the dog owners yell out "that is old (calling their dogs name) leading the pack."

The Best Dog!
Which one of these dogs will a young boy root for? Well with me living in the house with one of the fox chase trio it was not much of a choice. My second cousin's husband had one of the best, or was it my mother's sister's husband that had the best dog? Well it is too early in the night to tell. As I listen to the dogs and the talk of the owners, I begin to see that they all had the best dogs! At any rate one of these men had mastered the art of...

Fox Hunting
Mr. Janes brought his foldaway cot for to take a nap, while the chase was on. I have heard many times that Mr. Janes could sleep and listen to the dogs and call out which dog was leading the chase while sleeping.

When The Chase Ended
After all the coffee, food, talk and some napping it would be time to call the dogs off the trail and go home for the night. The hunters used a horn made from a large steer. The dogs were trained to come to the camp when the horn was blown a number of times. One of the worst things that could happen would be for one or two dogs to stay out and not come in for a day or two. Sometimes the owner would need to go looking for them. Who was the noted Fox Chase Trio? You guessed it if you said:Howard Walker, Luther G. Moss and G. B. Janes.

_Carlis


This story was posted on 2003-06-06 11:18:12
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