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October 14, 1977 Around Adair with Ed Waggener

This article first appeared in the October 14, 1977 issue of the Daily Statesman. Topics included the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA at Wikipedia), the first anniversary of the Burger Queen, and the way that various mayors of Christine planned to show their solidarity with Vester after a recent case of sign-thievery. --Pen

By Ed Waggener

I'm impressed
I have to admit I am impressed with the efficiency of the FmHA organization. The local agency came through for the hospital loan application beautifully. Dan Propes, the county office supervisor, streamlined the application procedure so that the forms were ready to go with the least agony for the Adair County Hospital District.

Propes' co-workers in the office are Marilyn Livesay, county office assistant, and Carolyn Cooksey, secretary.

District Director here, too
The District Director, V.T. Yarberry, is headquartered in the Columbia office, too. Yarberry works in 13 southern Kentucky counties from Columbia. The district includes, besides Adair, Warren, Simpson, Allen, Metcalfe, Monroe, Cumberland, Barren, Clinton, Russell, Taylor, Green, and Hart Counties.

If the rest of the government were run the way Yarberry's district office is, we wouldn't hear much complaining.


In this area, particularly, FmHA has meant new homes, better lives for farmers, better services, and now, it is meaning improved hospitals and industrialization.

Impact: Could be as high as $10,000,000 in two years
If the hospital loan goes through as expected, FmHA, with the rural water project, the hospital, and the other loans in Adair County, will have infused approximately $10,000,000 into the local economy in just two years. Any way you cut it, that's a lot of money.

Other Adair Countians are high in FmHA
Besides Yarberry, several other Adair Countians are high up in FmHA, both in the state and in the Washington office.

Glenn Bennett, a graduate of Adair County High School, is now Director of the Water and Waste Disposal Loan Division of FmHA in Washington, D.C.

As director of the division, Bennett answers directly to the National Administrator of FmHA, Gordon Kavanaugh.

Bennett is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bennett of Miami Route, Columbia.

Chesley Nell is District Director
Chesley Nell, a graduate of Adair County High School and a native of Gradyville, is now a District Director FmHA, working in the Lexington area. Several counties are in his district.

Nell is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Woodson Nell of Gradyville.

R.H. Walker in state FmHA office
R.H. Walker III, now of Richmond, is Rural Housing Specialist with FmHA's state headquarters in Lexington. His department specializes in rural rental housing loans. A loan such as the one which finances the Columbia Housing Partners' project between Hughes Street and Carrie Bolin Drive was made through this department.

Walker is the son of Nona Waggener Walker of Lexington and the late Herbert Walker, who was superintendent of Adair County Schools for several years. He is married to the former JoAnn Jones of Columbia.

All in all, FmHA good for Adair
We are proud of the accomplishments the Adair County men have made in FmHA, but prouder still of the work they are doing in this section of Kentucky. Our children will live in a far better world because of FmHA and these men.

A Columbia success story
Today marks the anniversary of Burger Queen of Columbia. Fifteen months ago, there were still skeptics who said that it would never open. But three people didn't have enough sense to know they were beat and went ahead and opened it anyway. The rest is history. The Burger Queen is one of the success stories of Columbia. Now when Gaylon Yarberry, James Brock and Clifton McGaha, the directors of the corporation which owns Burger Queen of Columbia, say something is going to happen, the old heads say, "When?"

A greater mystery
I have never questioned whether the three could pull it off or not. I believed early. And my faith yielded the right to eat the first Imperial Burger ever produced at Burger Queen of Columbia, and I am prouder of that than I would be if I had a Kentucky Colonelcy.

The big mystery to me, and apparently to others, is how Gaylon Yarberry ever got his pretty wife, Phyllis. It puzzled his kinsman, Vernon Yarberry, too. So much so that Vernon questioned Gaylon about it one day. "Tell me, Gaylon," Vernon asked, "how did you get a wife as pretty as yours?"

Gaylon answered, "I'll be honest with you, Vernon, I got her the same way you got Irene - I lied to her!"

Christine in mourning for Vester signs
A.L. Sinclair and D.G. Burton, co-mayors of Christine, say that they held a meeting Tuesday afternoon and decided to have a day of mourning for the signs which were stolen at Vester. "We're going to lower the flag to half-mast, close the pepper plant, and Donald Gene (Burton) is going to close on Thursday afternoon to show the people of Vester we sympathize with their losing their signs." The signs had been erected at the request of Robert Coffey of Vester.

Sinclair says that there is no comparison in the populations of the greater metropolitan area of Christine and Vester. "I counted up the number of people living between the Vester signs. There are six. You know how many people there are in Christine?" Sinclair asked. "Thirty-one," he answered.

Sinclair says that Christine is thinking of incorporating so that the community will be eligible for Federal grants and can hold town meetings to amuse the citizens as they do at Columbia.

It was the day she wasn't aiming to come to work
Yesterday was one of the biggest sales days, if not the biggest, for the six display ad salesmen who work in the Columbia office of Waggener-Walker Newspapers. One of the best producers, Betty Dulworth, was ready to kick herself. "To think," she said, "this is the day I thought I shouldn't come to work!"


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