ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 
























 
Lincoln's Birth Place

By: Col. Carlis B. Wilson

A Far Away Place
There was talk of a far away place where I had never been and knew little about. A neighbor family who lived on Harrods Fork was pretty well informed about historic places, having had two school teachers in the family. One of the sons of the Jim and Birdie Sparks family had a new pick-up truck--it was a 1946 in model year. He was one of the first, if not the first in that part of the county to own a new truck. He spent a lot of time building a high cattle rack for the bed. Was it a beautie, with the shiny paint and well built rack! The owner was none other than Mr. Allen Sparks, a young successful farmer.

The Road Trip
Allen begin telling the younger folks about the Abe Lincoln birth place. He said if we can get enough people interested in visiting Mr. Lincoln's birthplace he would take a load on his new truck. After some time had passed the day came that we were to make the road trip to the far away town of Hodgenville, KY for to see the this historic site.

Headed Out For The Day
There must have been about 10 or 12 of us all together. We gathered at his home on Harrods Fork Creek near Breeding KY We loaded up with our picnic lunches, secured the cattle rack and headed out for the day. At first it was rather cool riding on the back of the truck but as time went on we begin to need a time of refreshing which took place at Greensburg. After we had a pop and used the restroom we headed out again for the point of interest.

Big Building On The Hill
When we arrived the first thing I took notice of was the big building on the hill, with all the steps leading up to it. I had never seen so many steps and all of them the same size and length, nothing like the steps we had on the farm. Once inside the building we were told "This is the log cabin of President Abraham Lincoln Family, in this cabin is where Mr. Lincoln read so many books and came to know so much."

Cool Water And Picnic Lunch
The spring of Mr. Lincoln was next on the lists of things to see, it had steps going down into a deep hole in the ground, incased with rock and cool water running through it. Then we had our picnic lunch before visited the rest of the park and pulling out for the trip home.

About eight years later the wife and I visited the birth place again and there had been many improvements as well as added shops. I remember buying a large over-sized penny as a souvenir. Years later Mr. Allen Sparks married one of my first cousins, after the wife and I married we had the pleasure of spending a night with them on their farm on Harrods Fork Creek. Which brought back many memories of days gone by working with Allen and his sister Edra, who was my school teacher at Firkin School.

_Carlis


This story was posted on 2003-04-26 13:07:53
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.


 

To sponsor news and features on ColumbiaMagazine, please use our contact form.

 

























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


 

ColumbiaMagazine.com content is available as an RSS/XML feed for your RSS reader or other news aggregator.
Use the following link: http://www.columbiamagazine.com/columbiamagazinerss.php.

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270-250-2730 Fax: 270-751-0401


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.