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Letter: Meth has no boundaries

Re article 94844: KSP investigating death of man who died while in police custody

Commentary by John G Waddell

It is not uncommon, I'm told, to have Meth Dealers "Salt" the products they make, causing an elongated overall effect on all of the body's sensations.

Earlier this fall in the fringe areas of Adair County a middle-aged female was found completely naked setting in the middle of a pond runoff creek. The temp was just below 70 degrees.


Once located she was found to be disoriented and paranoid along with the obvious signs of drug intoxication. To my amazement, given the conditions along with the length of time this person stated she had been there, no signs of hypothermia or discomfort were indicated.

I consulted with a local Doctor the following day who gave me this account of what "Salted Meth" does to the human body. In his practice he has noted it is extremely dangerous and potentially deadly for the user as almost all warning senses indicating harm or pain are disrupted for up to 12 or even 16 hours.

When asked about the incident of hypothermia he stated a person with absolutely no protective clothing could be laying on a block of ice and have no discomfort. However the elements would still have the same damaging affects such as Frostbite and so forth even heart attack.

In the fringe areas of Adair county you just do not expect a naked woman sitting in the middle of a creek at 9pm. Meth and its side-effect crimes have no boundaries or limitations. John G Waddell


This story was posted on 2018-01-09 12:22:24
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