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Invasive Plant Field Day at Homeplace attended by 35+ people

Attendees learn that many botanical invaders arrived here as early as the early 1800's, often by landscaping companies, frequently by hitching a ride. There are control measures for about all these Invasive Plants ranging from chemical treatments to cutting prior to seed maturation.
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By Billy Joe Fudge, President, Homeplace on Green River

The over 35 people in attendance at the Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Invasive Plant Field Day at Homeplace were fully informed by professionals from the Kentucky Division of Forestry, Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, Natural Resource Conservation Service and University of Kentucky Extension.


] These experts identified many plants which have been brought to our shores as far back as the early 1800's and more are still coming today. Many of the plants hitch a ride by plane or ship but it seems that a large amount are being imported for landscaping purposes.

There are control measures for about all these Invasive Plants ranging from chemical treatments to cutting prior to seed maturation.

The recommendation from all the experts was to seek advice and assistance from professionals particularly Kentucky Division of Forestry Foresters and your respective University of Kentucky Extension Agents.


This story was posted on 2017-06-15 04:41:05
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Adair Agent Nick Roy wears glove handling Poison Hemlock



2017-06-15 - Homeplace on Green River, 5807 New Columbia Road, Campellsville, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, retired district forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry, President of Homeplace on Green River.
Adair County Extension Agent, Nick Roy, gave a sobering talk about Poison Hemlock. Nick was actually wearing a glove on his left hand to handle the hazardous plant. He said that as with Poison Ivy, some might be more susceptible to the toxins of Poison Hemlock than others but it is indeed very toxic. According to my memory two pounds consumed by a thousand pound cow could be deadly. He did say that standing in the pasture, cattle most probably would not eat it as long as they had plenty of grass, however he warned that should the Poison Hemlock be mixed with grass in the haying process, the cattle might consume enough to sicken or kill themselves.

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Joyce Bender points out invasive grasses on HGR trailhead



2017-06-15 - Homeplace on Green River, 5807 New Columbia Road, Campellsville, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, retired district forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry, President of Homeplace on Green River.
Joyce Bender with the Nature Preserves Commission points out Invasive Grasses near the Homeplace Trailhead of the Tebb's Bend - Nature and Recreation Area. - BILLY JOE FUDGE

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Worthless Tree of Heaven taking up Oak, Poplar, Walnut space



2017-06-15 - Homeplace on Green River, 5807 New Columbia Road, Campellsville, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, retired district forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry, President of Homeplace on Green River.
Kentucky Division of Forestry Forest Health Specialist, Abe Nielsen describes how Invasive Plants actually compete and in many cases can actually alter complete ecosystems killing and suppressing native plants, destroying food sources and habitat that many wild animals depend upon. The general idea for forest landowners is "if you're growing Tree of Heaven which is useless, you are not growing Oak, Poplar or Walnut". - BILLY JOE FUDGE

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