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Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter III

In this chapter, Billy Joe Fudge traces Demumbrunn ancestry from what is now Edmonson, now Metcalfe Counties into the Toria community of Adair County, KY. And issues an ancecdote about his grandmother's swift blunt comeuppance of a thoughtless borrower at her door.
Click on headline for complete Chapter III with photo(s)
NEXT EARLIER CHAPTER: Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter II

By Billy Joe Fudge

One of the hallmarks of strong-willed, morally confident people is a proclivity to tell the truth, even in the face of accusations of possessing an uncaring attitude.

Their personal philosophy seems to be, "pity accomplishes nothing but the truth will set the captive free" or at least, put those with a smart mouth in their place.

My Great-Great Grandmother, Lucy Clark Demumbrunn seems to have been one of those folks with this weighty, personal philosophy and a story shared by one of my cousins seems to reflect Lucy Clark's personality very well.


A lady, or so she was described as one, came to Lucy Clark one day to petition her for some red pepper and a gourd. She apparently sought to interject some levity into this awkward situation by saying, "It has been said that it takes a high tempered person to raise red pepper and a fool to raise gourds and that is why I have neither".

Lucy Clark replied, "neither your temperament nor your foolishness is the cause of your lack. The reason you have no red pepper or gourds is because of your laziness"!

Needless to say, the lady left with neither red pepper nor gourds.

My Great-great-great grandfather, William Carrol Demumbrunn, Lucy Clark's father was born March 18, 1821 in Edmonson County, KY. Of course, Edmonson County was not formed until 4 years later, in 1825.

He married Lucy Gholes Wisdom and made his home in Metcalfe County which did not become a county until 1860.

He had 11 children, including Lucy Clark, and died in 1886.

He was a Preacher, most likely a Circuit Rider.

Back in the day churches were small and could not afford a full time minister, so Preachers would pastor, so to speak, a number of churches preaching at a different one each Sunday of the month.

Reading the chapters going forward:
  1. Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter I
  2. Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter II
  3. Kentucky Color: Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter III
  4. Kentucky Color - Lucy Clark Demumbrunn Chapter IV


This story was posted on 2016-12-25 05:15:33
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KY Color: William Carrol Demumbrunn, ggg grandfather of writer



2016-12-25 - Metcalfe County, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
My Great-great-great grandfather, William Carrol Demumbrunn, Lucy Clark's father was born March 18, 1821 in Edmonson County, KY. Of course, Edmonson County was not formed until 4 years later, in 1825. He married Lucy Gholes Wisdom and made his home in Metcalfe County which did not become a county until 1860. He had 11 children, including Lucy Clark, and died in 1886. He was a Preacher, most likely a Circuit Rider.Back in the day churches were small and could not afford a full time minister, so Preachers would pastor, so to speak, a number of churches preaching at a different one each Sunday of the month.


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