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KY Color: How not to, and how to prune a tree

Proper tree PRUNING dramatically lengthens the useful life of a tree. Retired District Forester Billy Joe Fudge sends photos today, full sized in the linked album, which simplifies the concept of PRUNING, as opposed to indiscriminate TRIMMING and, sin-of-sins, TOPPING, which he and other trained tree men adamantly oppose
Click on headline for full story w/photo(s)

By Billy Joe Fudge

Pictures are worth a thousand words on how not to prune a tree - and how to do it the right way. There are three examples I've come up with to illustrate both.

#1 is a Sugar Maple limb which was topped or cut off incorrectly. It sprouted out a couple of years but could not sustain itself and died.

It is dead all the way back to the main tree trunk and is being attacked by insects and rot and at the same time providing an open sore for them to attack the living parts of the tree.

The dead limbs and sprouts will fall at some point and are a hazard which could cause serious injury or death.


#2 is a Sugar Maple limb which was pruned incorrectly and died without sprouting.

It too is dead all the way back to the main tree trunk
and is being attacked by insects and rot and at the same time providing an open sore for them to attack the living parts of the tree.

The dead limb will fall at some point and is a hazard which could cause serious injury or death.


#3 is a Sugar Maple limb which was pruned correctly at or near the limb collar.

The limb collar is full of enzymes and chemicals which will initiate scar tissue growth to quickly cover the wound and preserve the wound against decay and insect attack until the scar tissue completely covers the wound.

- Billy Joe Fudge is a retired District Forester who shares his passion for healthy forests - urban, campus, conservancy, and profitable farmland woodlands - frequently on ColumbiaMagazine.com. He is also has occasional openings as professional consult forest consultant.


This story was posted on 2016-06-27 07:55:13
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KY Color: Tree pruning lessons. #1 Incorrect



2016-06-27 - Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
# 1 is a Sugar Maple limb which was topped or cut off incorrectly. It sprouted out a couple of years but could not sustain itself and died. It is dead all the way back to the main tree trunk and is being attacked by insects and rot and at the same time providing an open sore for them to attack the living parts of the tree. The dead limbs and sprouts will fall at some point and are a hazard which could cause serious injury or death. - Billy Joe Fudge

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



KY Color: Tree pruning lessons. #2 Incorrect method



2016-06-27 - Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
#2 is a Sugar Maple limb which was pruned incorrectly and died without sprouting. It too is dead all the way back to the main tree trunk and is being attacked by insects and rot and at the same time providing an open sore for them to attack the living parts of the tree. The dead limb will fall at some point and is a hazard which could cause serious injury or death. - Billy Joe Fudge

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



KY Color: Tree pruning lessons. #3 Healing, Correctly Pruned



2016-06-27 - Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
#3 is a Sugar Maple limb which was pruned correctly at or near the limb collar. The limb collar is full of enzymes and chemicals which will initiate scar tissue growth to quickly cover the wound and preserve the wound against decay and insect attack until the scar tissue completely covers the wound. - Billy Joe Fudge

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



 

























 
 
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