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Great Wooded South: Mr. Fudge sends paper on processed meats

'There was a time when waste not, want no, was not just a discipline but, often times, a matter of life and death. The scraping of every bone and the grinding of every cartilage could mean that extra few meals that would not have been had, otherwise. There was simply no grocery store to which one could go to get more.'
Comments re photo 64343. Epicurean Kentuckian What that line on chicken viennies is for

By Billy Joe Fudge

I must apologize for the Great Wooded South University's failure to release the paper addressing this issue. Our Culinary Department has done extensive research concerning processed meats, especially how they originated in the GWS when times were hard.


There was a time when "waste not, want no" was not just a discipline but, often times, a matter of life and death. The scraping of every bone and the grinding of every cartilage could mean that extra few meals that would not have been had, otherwise. There was simply no grocery store to which one could go to get more.

The Great Wooded South University is doing extensive research at present concerning the necessity of bringing the canning of meat back into vogue in our homes. This is another subject for another day but with our society is so dependent upon "brought on" food that it is headed for an unimaginable crisis of mythic proportions should our power grid and electronically controlled equipment (cars, trucks, planes, ships, barges) should be knocked out of service even for a week a month or God forbid, for months.

Anyway, on a lighter note, some of our research has even indicated that the term "Rock and roll" which became a part of he national vernacular in the 50's actually was coined in the GWS during the depression during "Vienna Sausage and Cracker" dining sessions. - Billy Joe Fudge-


This story was posted on 2016-01-19 08:36:46
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