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Kentucky Color - Brown Needles and Little Sermons

'Our old Columbia Urban Forest, Bald Cypress is the same species which grows in the swamp waters all over the South including many sections of far Western Kentucky. They are very adaptable and may be just what the Doctor ordered for your landscaping needs.' - Forester Billy Joe Fudge
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By Billy Joe Fudge

Not in this particular case but in my past life as a, sort of, liaison between the forest and a not so informed public, I've responded to many "my pine tree's needles are turning brown, is it dying" calls.

While taking pictures of this beautiful Bald Cypress near Downtown Columbia many of those human/tree interface situations came rushing back to me. One in particular stands out in my mind.


After very tactfully informing a homeowner that he had killed his own White Pine by over applying Ammonia Nitrate fertilizer, he proceeded to tell me that I had no idea what I was talking about and he would never need my services again. That is the "cleaned up, suitable for prime time" interpretation of his little sermon, more or less.

At any rate this is a Bald Cypress, of course. Bald Cypress have needles and give the appearance of being evergreen trees but their needles fall off during winter and sometime give homeowners the impression that they have passed on; especially homeowners who have purchased their property during the summer months and have erroneously assumed that their Bald Cypress is a Pine or Spruce Tree.

So then, yes, our old Columbia Urban Forest, Bald Cypress is the same species which grows in the swamp waters all over the South including many sections of far Western Kentucky. They are very adaptable and may be just what the Doctor ordered for your landscaping needs.


Billy Joe Fudge, the writer, is a 'Retired' District Forester for the Kentucky Division of Forestry, who is still very active in the timber industry and in attending to the affairs of Homeplace on Green River as the organization's vice president.


This story was posted on 2015-12-12 04:56:39
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Kentucky Color - Brown Needles and Little Sermons



2015-12-12 - Burkesville & Church Streets, Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
'This is a Bald Cypress, of course. Bald Cypress have needles and give the appearance of being evergreen trees but their needles fall off during winter and sometime give homeowners the impression that they have passed on.' - Billy Joe Fudge

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