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Adair County High School observes Hour of Code

Microsoft, Apple, and other leaders in the industry have banded together to create the "Hour of Code" incentive. The movement encourages schools to incorporate "code writing into one hour of school" to show students truly how easy and fun code writing can be
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By Shamarie Claiborne, Media Coordinator
Adair County School District, 1204 Greensburg Street, Columbia, KY

If you look around our world today, technology has become so common we tend to take it for granted. I remember my first computer only did word processing and was the most awesome Christmas gift I had ever seen, even though it took up my entire desk. What a difference 30 years makes! Today my phone has more memory than most computers I have owned.


Many people never stop and think "how" all these wonderful gadgets work. It really isn't hard and is done by people who know how to interface with the "gadget". It is called creating code or coding (in my day we was called computer programming). It all means the same thing. In simplest terms, code makes apps, software, etc do something or look a certain way. When I started programming we used BASIC, COBAL, Pascal now it is Java, C++, SQL in the end they are all the same. You manipulate the machine to do what you want.

Since the creation of computers there has been a shortage of individuals who could "code". Currently, if you look at the ratio of items that are ran by computers, compared to the number of people who can manipulate them, the figures are not good. There is a major shortage of programmers.

That is why Microsoft, Apple, and other leaders in the industry have banded together to create the "Hour of Code" incentive. The movement encourages schools to incorporate "code writing into one hour of school" to show students truly how easy and fun code writing can be.

Kentucky's Department of Education chose yesterday to be our official "Day of Code". When the incentive was sent out Teresa Giles, the new Technology teacher at ACHS, jumped on board and approximately 100 students wrote code yesterday in Adair County.
Hopefully, one day soon, we can include a pathway in computer programming to help combat the global shortage of "code writers". For more information you can visit Hour of code.com

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This story was posted on 2014-12-12 13:56:10
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Teresa Giles instructs students during Hour of Code



2014-12-12 - ACHS, 526 Indian Drive, Columbia KY - Photo by Shamarie Claiborne, Adair Co. School District.
Teresa Giles, new Technology teacher at ACHS assisting Michaela Stonecypher as she learns to write code during the "Hour of Code" initiative yesterday. Also shown are fellow coders Jordan Lasley, Bryson Harris, and Cameron Lasley. - Shamarie Claiborne, Media Coordinator, Adair County School District

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Nick Taylor engrossed in writing code



2014-12-12 - ACHS, 526 Indian Drive, Columbia KY - Photo by Shamarie Claiborne, Adair Co. School District.
Nick Taylor was totally engaged writing code during the "Hour of Code" yesterday at ACHS. Will Wilson and Cameron Taylor are also shown in the frame.

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