ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 
























 
Carol Perkins: Edmonton to Horse Cave II: The show is saved

This thrilling episode in the adventures of Susan & Carol continues as involved rescue begins, with the Susan & Carol show saved by the heroism of Billy Compton, of the local funeral director and the loan of the Lincoln family car used for procession; and OW conservative driver Susan heroically piloting the silky smooth Lincoln swiftly across the LBN. Susan & Carol Unscripted was saved. With only one more puzzle back in the capital of Metcalfe County, Edmonton: The search for Carol's Car.
Next earlier Carol Perkins column: Carol Sullivan: Edmonton to Horse Cave; trouble was with me. Posted August 10, 2014

By Carol Perkins

To pick up from last week, as Susan and I sat in my car in the middle of a dangerous street in Munice Court, out of gas and a battery deader than a doornail, we felt we were surely going to miss our Susan and Carol-Unscripted Radio Show on 99.1 the Hoss. Then over the hill in a two-ton truck came the light at the end of the tunnel in the form of our local funeral director.


"Girls, you all need help?" he said passing me on the wrong side of the road since I had taken up his side.

A familiar Lincoln materializes

Susan jumped out and pulled herself up to the window, her feet dangling in the air. "Help, we need something to drive to Cave City for our radio show." I couldn't hear what he said but she immediately heaved herself into the truck (no running boards for us short people) and motioned for me to leave the car with Billy Compton (the first man on the scene) and get in. "I can't get in." My hip did not touch the floor board and she couldn't pull me up. "I'll walk up the hill to the funeral home and you pick me up."

After I recovered from the walk up the hill, I couldn't find Susan or Donnie. I missed the conversation about the garage, but soon there she was in the Lincoln generally used to transport family members to the cemetery. I jumped in and off we went. Riding in that car was like gliding on silk.

Only in a small town like ours could this happen

My last memory was looking down the hill where my stalled car sat with the hood up (Billy had thought to do that) and my words to him were, "I'm just leaving it to you and Donnie. Thanks so much." I didn't ask Billy if he had somewhere to be; I thought later that he might have been on his way to something very important. Donnie and Billy took care of us-only in a small town would people be so trusting of each other.

My last memory leaving town was looking down the hill where my stalled car sat with the hood up (Billy had thought to do that) and my words to him were, "I'm just leaving it to you and Donnie. Thanks so much." I didn't ask Billy if he had somewhere to be; I thought later that he might have been on his way to something very important. Donnie and Billy took care of us-only in a small town would people be so trusting of each other.

Sped across LBN rather than take usual route through Big Meadow

"Let's take the Parkway," I suggested because we could make better time than going our usual way through Big Meadow. Susan, a careful and relatively conservative driver, was soon kicking that Lincoln on up to 90 as I kept a lookout in the side mirror. "I've got your back. Let's go." In record time we were in Cave City but fell behind a garbage truck. In the meantime, I had reached the station and Joe Berry kept the music going. (Donnie will never let us drive his car again!)

'Have you seen Susan's Car?'

When we came back to Edmonton, I scouted the service station where my car might have been and didn't see it. Susan pulled up to the pump to put gas in Donnie's car but neither of us knew how to release the gas cover. "Have you seen Carol Perkins's car," Susan asked the girl who was ready to pump the gas. She didn't know me or my car.

We circled the Justice Center in case it might have been left there. Tommy Garrett was standing on the front steps, talking to a couple of other guys. Susan leaned out the window and said, "Have you seen Carol's car?" With his quick wit he replied, "No, has she lost it?"

Finally, we spotted it in the funeral home parking lot, so I took Susan home, returned the funeral home car, and went inside to thank Donnie. By then he was dressed up and preparing for the afternoon. "You might want to get gas," he said with a smile.

Bobby would have loved this story

As I was leaving I noticed Donnie taking flowers down to the main chapel where visitation would soon begin for long time businessman and community friend, Bob Branstetter (Bob's Auto). I stood for a moment outside the door and smiled. "Bobby would have gotten a kick out of this story." Then I headed for the Marathon for a full tank of gas. We thank Billy and Donnie for taking their time to get my car running and saving the day. Only in a small town!


Carol Perkins, the writer, is an author, weekly radio talk show Host on The Hoss, 99.1 FM, on the Tuesdays at 10amCT, Susan (Chambers) & Carol (Perkins) Unscripted and is owner of Main Street Screenprinting PO Box 1051 601 S. Main Street Edmonton, KY 42120 270-432-3152 270-670-4913


This story was posted on 2014-08-17 04:47:38
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.


 

To sponsor news and features on ColumbiaMagazine, please use our contact form.

 

























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


 

ColumbiaMagazine.com content is available as an RSS/XML feed for your RSS reader or other news aggregator.
Use the following link: http://www.columbiamagazine.com/columbiamagazinerss.php.

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270-250-2730 Fax: 270-751-0401


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.