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Bill Troutwine defends hunting; asks questions...

'My point is what makes one animals life more valuable than another? . . . some people think we should not prey on wild animals, but it is ok to prey on domestic stock. Myself, I can't understand the difference. - BILL TROUTWINE
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By Bill Troutwine
Personal Commentary of the writer

I am a hunter and have hunted in 12 states including two trips to Alaska plus several trips to Canada. I hunt for sport and food. I'll admit food is not the primary reason for my hunting, but the thing I can not understand is why some people think it is bad to kill a deer and there is nothing wrong with killing a cow. I'm sure if you ask the cow she will tell you to kill the deer instead.


I noticed that Peg stated a hunter friend said a number of different wild meats they consume taste like chicken. Her statement was "Well why not eat chicken, then?" My question is what about the chickens that have to die so they can be substituted for the wild meat that would have been consumed? My point is what makes one animals life more valuable than another?

You mention that Connecticut has a very controlled and regulated hunt to control populations in certain areas. As far as I know all deer hunts in every state are controlled hunts designed to harvest excess game and maintain a stable population.

In order to make an arguable case for not hunting I would think you would have to be a total vegetarian, and be against the killing of anything. What you propose is substituting one animal's life for another.

I do understand how you feel though, and I agree with you that deer are beautiful animals, but so is a new born calf.

Every time I kill an animal I have a certain amount of regret, and I respect the sacrifice of that life, and we make sure we use all the meat to honor the animal. I am teaching my Grandchildren to hunt, as I did my children. One of our absolute rules is if you kill it you eat it, unless it is a destructive predator.

Man has been a predator since the beginning, and probably always will be. It is just that some people think we should not prey on wild animals, but it is ok to prey on domestic stock. Myself, I can't understand the difference. --Bill Troutwine Comments re article 63365 Happy Tail Happy hunting


This story was posted on 2013-11-18 07:33:57
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