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Kentucky Color - Greenbriar

It's a beautiful plant, and there are two kinds in our parts. And author says, 'As an aside and to the best of my ability to determine these things mathematically, Greenbriar Ridge is the Geographic center of Common Greenbriar Habitat for North America.' And he has a dire warning for unsuspecting who might experience a close encounter with the Common Greenbriar's cousin, Sawbriar
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By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

Common Greenbriar is a most beautiful plant that grows along roadsides and trails, in fencerows, and about anywhere it can find a little direct or filtered sunlight. It is a climber and uses tendrils to attach itself to other plants, vines and trees that will support its ascension upward toward sunlight.


Its leaves and tender shoots make it an important browse plant for deer in our area. Its blackish berries hang on into winter and have always been a favorite for Cardinals. A winter's walk along edges of snow covered fields and along forest trails in Greenbriar country will almost invariably lead to vivid memories of Cardinals hopping and flapping about from place to place feeding on Greenbriar.

As an aside and to the best of my ability to determine these things mathematically, Greenbriar Ridge is the Geographic center of Common Greenbriar Habitat for North America.

There are several hundred Greenbriars but only two which are notable according to my experience trekking the back country of the Great Wooded South. The second is Saw Greenbriar.

Around these parts the Saw Greenbriar is referred to as Sawbriar. It is usually no more than a foot above ground but is most often, precisely, ankle height. Many a young man, including this one, who had succumbed to the fashionable demand for low topped tennis shoes worn over sockless feet were brought back to the realities of the natural world upon dragging an ankle through the "cat of nine tails", ground hugging, razor wire briars of the Sawbriar. - Billy Joe Fudge


This story was posted on 2012-10-21 07:02:56
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Kentucky Color - Greenbriar



2012-10-21 - Adair County, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester, KY State Division of Forestry.
Common Greenbriar is a most beautiful plant that grows along roadsides and trails, in fencerows, and about anywhere it can find a little direct or filtered sunlight. It is a climber and uses tendrils to attach itself to other plants, vines and trees that will support its ascension upward toward sunlight. - Billy Joe Fudge

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