ColumbiaMagazine.com
Printed from:

Welcome to Columbia Magazine  
 

























 
Kentucky Color - Late or early?

Great flocks of migrating Canada Geese used to be seen as heralds of a season in rural Kentucky. Now small numbers are permanent residents. At Hopewell Acres - the Chowning Place on Crocus Creek in Amandaville, Cumberland County, KY - they are as common as livestock would be on most any South Central Kentucky farm

By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

Late or early, that is the first thought that comes to mind every time I see Canada Geese during late Spring and Summer here in the Great Wooded South. The reality is that the answer is most likely, neither.


As a child and young adult I still remember the honking of groups of hundreds overhead on their way South in the Fall and back North in the Spring. Our small farm pond would be covered at times when the Geese would land to rest and graze on the surrounding hillside pastures.

For the most part they only made these stops in the Fall. I always tended to believe that often times they would have less than optimum tail winds to provide the lift needed to clear the Ridge which is 200 to 300 feet higher than most of the terrain they had been flying over after crossing the Muldraugh Ridge on their way South.

Because of a number of environmental factors such as climate change and food sources we no longer see or hear those great migrating flocks around these parts.

The honking of Canada Geese has been replaced by the gargling of Sandhill Cranes. These days about all the Canada Geese we see are local residents that most probably don't migrate at all.

I suspect these three Geese a-wading and four Geese a-swimming at Hopewell Acres on Crocus Creek would fit into that category. - by Billy Joe Fudge


This story was posted on 2012-06-14 06:27:16
Printable: this page is now automatically formatted for printing.
Have comments or corrections for this story? Use our contact form and let us know.


To sponsor news and features on ColumbiaMagazine, please use our contact form.

Kentucky Color: Canada Geese, Early or Late?



2012-06-14 - Along Crocus Creek - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge.
Canada Geese:
Because of a number of environmental factors such as climate change and food sources we no longer see or hear those great migrating flocks around these parts. The honking of Canada Geese has been replaced by the gargling of Sandhill Cranes. These days about all the Canada Geese we see are local residents that most probably don't migrate at all. I suspect these three Geese a-wading and four Geese a-swimming at Hopewell Acres on Crocus Creek would fit into that category. - Billy Joe Fudge

Read More... | Comments? | Click here to share, print, or bookmark this photo.



 























 
 
Quick Links to Popular Features


 

ColumbiaMagazine.com content is available as an RSS/XML feed for your RSS reader or other news aggregator.
Use the following link: http://www.columbiamagazine.com/columbiamagazinerss.php.

Contact us: Columbia Magazine and columbiamagazine.com are published by D'Zine, Ltd., PO Box 906, Columbia, KY 42728.
Phone: 270-250-2730 Fax: 270-751-0401


Please use our contact page, or send questions about technical issues with this site to webmaster@columbiamagazine.com. All logos and trademarks used on this site are property of their respective owners. All comments remain the property and responsibility of their posters, all articles and photos remain the property of their creators, and all the rest is copyright 1995-Present by Columbia! Magazine and D'Zine, Ltd. Privacy policy: use of this site requires no sharing of information. Voluntarily shared information may be published and made available to the public on this site and/or stored electronically. Anonymous submissions will be subject to additional verification. Cookies are not required to use our site. However, if you have cookies enabled in your web browser, some of our advertisers may use cookies for interest-based advertising across multiple domains. For more information about third-party advertising, visit the NAI web privacy site.