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Clay Hill Memorial Forest may be recognized as prehistoric site

Clay Hill Memorial Forest to be submitted for inclusion in historic registry as a known prehistoric site. If you go: Clay Hill Memorial Forest, 7426 Old Lebanon RD, Campbellsville, KY 42718 (Bing Map), is located 26 miles from Columbia, KY.
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By Linda Waggener
News from Campbellsville University

CAMPBELLSVILLE, KY - Clay Hill Memorial Forest (CHMF) has been designated for submission toward inclusion in Kentucky's historic registry as a "known prehistoric site" thanks to the work of the Kentucky Archaeological Survey team and visiting students from the area.

CHMF is Campbellsville University's science and nature preserve. Middle School students from Lebanon and Campbellsville Independent schools spent a morning at CHMF recently searching for and plotting graphs of locations of Indian artifacts.


Three archaeologists from the Kentucky Archaeological Survey conducted a hands-on archaeological survey of one of the CHMF warm season grass fields burned off in early April. One of the students told CHMF director Dr. Gordon Weddle, "Today we made history."

If history wasn't made, then it was discovered as four arrowheads were found which date to what is known as the early-archaic period, 10,000 years before present day, according to Eric Schlarb, staff archaeologist with the Kentucky Archaeological Survey at the University of Kentucky. Schlarb, organizer of the event, said he was very impressed with the site. His group will make a follow-up visit and professionally map the site and submit it for inclusion in the historic registry.

All of the artifacts found will be returned to CHMF for a future prehistory display at the Joan White Howell Environmental Center. Assisting Weddle with the special event at CHMF were Dr. Glenn McQuaide, associate professor of biology at CU; Dr. Richie Kessler, CU associate professor of biology and environmental studies program coordinator; and Alicia Bosela, CU instructor in biology and assistant director of Clay Hill.

Campbellsville University biology majors, chemistry majors plus pre-dental, pre-engineering, pre-medical, pre-medical technology, pre-nursing, pre-optometry, pre-pharmacy and pre-veterinarian students are among those who experience Clay Hill Memorial Forest as a part of their career preparation courses.

It is central to the university's growing green and earth stewardship movements and is a regional center for environmental education available to non-science and general education students as well. Over 35,000 local elementary, middle and high school students have visited CHMF on field trips since it was donated to Campbellsville University in 1996 in memory of the Joan White Howell family.

Clay Hill Memorial Forest is used to promote environmental education on all levels and serves as an on-site teaching center and outdoor learning laboratory for K-12 students and teachers, university scholars, scientists, researchers, government agencies, community leaders and faculty members. Upcoming events at CHMF include the annual Outdoor Classroom Institute where teachers receive training in the art of teaching science. Presenters at this year's week-long session include: Dr. Mark McKinnon, Tim Sutter, Susan Pope, Lorinda Jones, Paula Roberts, Jeff and Henrietta Scott, John Blair and Georgia Purtee.

For more information, or to schedule a visit to Clay Hill Memorial Forest, contact Dr. Gordon Weddle, professor of biology at CU and CHMF Director, at 270-789-5328 or by email at gweddle@campbellsville.edu.



This story was posted on 2012-05-27 03:15:01
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Joan White Howell Environmental Center welcomes



2012-05-27 - 7426 Old Lebanon RD, Campbellsville, KY - Photo by Linda Waggener, CU photo.
The Joan White Howell Environmental Center welcomes students to Clay Hill Memorial Forest all year long. Campbellsville Independent and Lebanon Middle Schoolers gathered recently to learn about archaeology. - Linda Waggener, Campbellsville University

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Burn prepares ground for archaeological dig



2012-05-27 - 7426 Old Lebanon RD, Campbellsville, KY - Photo by Harry Haynes. CU photo.
Burning off grassland
was part of an exercise to prepare ground for an archaeological survey held recently at Clay Hill Memorial Forest, Campbellsville University's science and nature preserve. -Linda Waggener, Campbellsville University

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Leah Hazelwood, Lebanon, KY, gets high marks



2012-05-27 - 7426 Old Lebanon RD, Campbellsville, KY - Photo by Linda Waggener, CU photo.
Leah Hazelwood, Lebanon Middle School sixth grader at right, got high marks on her plotting map of the discovery locations in the recent archaeological survey at Clay Hill Memorial Forest. She said she liked the math part of the exercise. Kentucky Archaeological Survey staff archaeologist Eric Schlarb, at left, and his team came to Clay Hill to set up the grid for the work that middle school students followed. - Linda Waggener, Campbellsville Universtiy

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Dr. Glenn McQuaide leads study



2012-05-27 - 7426 Old Lebanon RD, Campbellsville, KY - Photo by Linda Waggener.
Dr. Glenn McQuaide, associate professor of biology at CU, standing, leads visiting students studying the world of science at Clay Hill Memorial Forest. Dr. McQuaide is a native and resident of Columbia, KY. - Linda Waggener, Campbellsville, KY

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Stepping gently through new grass favored over indoors



2012-05-27 - 7426 Old Lebanon RD, Campbellsville, KY - Photo by Linda Waggener.
Stepping gently through new grass, with Eric Schlarb, archaeologist red shirt, leading, on a May 2012 morning was favored by most of these students from Lebanon Middle and Campbellsville Independent schools over sitting in a classroom. Kentucky Archaeological Survey staff archaeologist Eric Schlarb, facing the camera, was the lead archaeologist of three to visit Clay Hill Memorial Forest and survey for historic artifacts. - Linda Waggener

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