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Kentucky Color - The Taming of Dug Hill

Dug Hill on KY 704 is only being tamed somewhat. But the change triggers memories of gentler times, when winding roads themselves were important elements of the journey. Thank God that even a tamer Dug Hill will still slow us down on our descent onto Crocus Creek and into the past and hopefully, into the future, he writes.
The next earlier Kentucky Color: Kentucky Color - Snowball Bush

By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired District Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

For several decades now Dug Hill in all it's glory as a lofty sentinel has been serving as a prelude to the mysterious, often mist shrouded land of Crocus Creek. It has slowed us and caused us to look, listen, feel and live. Thankfully, Dug Hill is not being replaced by the placid gentle slope of a new route but is only being tamed somewhat with more width to accommodate 21st century traffic.


I'm sorry but my heart laments that cars have become air conditioned, wrap around sounded, lap of luxury, transportation pods that have insulated their passengers from the sights, the sounds, the smells, and the wind in their hair sensations of driving.

Gone are the days when vehicles were aptly labeled touring cars. Now, it seems, drivers of cars and passengers in cars are oblivious to the real world that surrounds them. Like an ant from nest to bait and bait to nest and nest to bait and bait to nest until there is no more bait and no more nest.

The days have long since gone yet I can still hear lone tractor trailer, tandem and single-axle trucks descending and ascending Dug Hill and others with air horns blasting warnings to approaching traffic to make way for their massive frames that seemed to encompass the entire road.

I can still remember when drivers were attentive and watchful and friendly and alive and respectful.

I can still remember when drivers would stop and pull a limb out of the road instead of speeding by and calling 911 to clean up the mess.

I can still remember when drivers took the time to toot their horns at men and women working along the roadside.

I can still remember when drivers took the time to stop at country stores for a Pepsi and a banana flip.

I can still remember when rest stops were used by drivers to rest not just to use the toilet.

Thank God that even a tamer Dug Hill will still slow us down on our descent onto Crocus Creek and into the past and hopefully, into the future. - Billy Joe Fudge


This story was posted on 2012-05-06 01:03:03
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Kentucky Color: The Taming of Dug Hill



2012-05-06 - KY 704, Inroad, Adair Co., KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge. Progress, nostalgia: "Dug Hill is not being replaced by the placid gentle slope of a new route but is only being tamed somewhat with more width to accommodate 21st century traffic," Billy Joe Fudge writes, and adds a melancholy note, in this Sunday's Kentucky Color,"I'm sorry but my heart laments that cars have become air conditioned, wrap around sounded, lap of luxury, transportation pods that have insulated their passengers from the sights, the sounds, the smells, and the wind in their hair sensations of driving."
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