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The Lindsey-Wilson: Pride of every thinking person in Adair Co.

By JIM

With Lindsey Wilson opening more new buildings this fall, the men's soccer team winning yet another NAIA title, and the school set to confer 287 degrees at week's end, a look at how Lindsey was viewed several decades ago might be of interest.

The following excerpts appeared in an article about "the closing of the Fourteenth year of the Lindsey-Wilson Training School" in the May 23, 1917 edition of the Adair County News.



There is not a more healthy location in Kentucky than where the Lindsey-Wilson buildings are situated. They are located on a hill, giving a fine view of the whole town of Columbia. There is plenty of shade, and the water is as fine as ever come out of the ground. The buildings are heated by steam and are lighted by electricity...Nearly fifty thousand dollars has been expended in erecting buildings and furnishing the same.

More than half a dozen towns were after the school, but the enterprising people of Columbia won out by their most liberal donations.

Before the Lindsey-Wilson was established, Columbia had a population, according to the census, of 622 souls. It now numbers its inhabitants to something close to 1,500. There have been more dwellings built in Columbia in the last fourteen years than were in it before the school was started.

The pupils who come from a distance patronize out merchants and grocers, hence Columbia business men are greatly benefited in a financial way. It should be the pride of every thinking person in Adair County. Its friends are not only loyal to the school, but also glory in the advancement of the town.

The graduating class of May, 1917 was somewhat smaller than that of December, 2011. Those completing the Training School (i.e., high school) curriculum were Miss Nellie Huffaker and Messrs. Howard Garner, Robert Willis, William Hynes, and Tye Faulkner. In addition, Miss Sallie E. Murphy received a diploma in expression and Miss Margie Buster the same in the music course. Among the graduates, Howard Garner, a close cousin of former Lindsey Wilson student and track star Fred Rainwater, became a physician and surgeon of some note; Raymond Tye Faulkner became "one of Taylor County's most prominent and well-known farmers;" Sally E. Murphy became Mrs. Tye Faulkner; William Hynes, better known by his middle name, Strouther, was graduated from Georgetown College (Ky.) in 1922 and later accepted a Rhodes scholarship and earned the BA in law from Oxford.

-JIM


This story was posted on 2011-12-05 20:29:02
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