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101 years ago: Thanksgiving in Adair Co., KY

It was already, in 1910, a magnificent day of over-indulgence, nowhere more so than at the elegant dinner served at the Hancock Hotel
First printed, CM, Thanksgiving 2010)

By "Jim"

Thanksgiving menu, Thanksgiving humor, Thanksgiving reflections, 1910 (collected from various editions of the Adair County News)

"Educated turkeys have been roosting higher than is customary for several days in and around Roy. (From the Roy community newsletter. This odd phenomenon was also reported in the Cyclone community.)


The Thanksgiving menu at the Hancock Hotel: Roast beef, grape jelly, apple sauce, cream potatoes, turkey, cranberries, celery, chipped potatoes, scalloped oysters, chicken, nut salad, salmon salad, pickles, wafers, corn bread, biscuit, lightbread, butter, tea, coffee, milk, black cake, marble cake, Tuti fruiti cake, and custard.

(This bit of inspired politico-Thanksgiving humor appeared in the November 30, 1910 News.)"I am grateful," said the first prominent citizen, "to observe the undercurrent of joy in the Thanksgiving proclamation of the governor. Hitherto the proclamations have been along the old cut and dried, stilted forms, but in this instance there is a certain tone of joyousness, of thankfulness, of pure gratefulness, that is truly inspiring."

"Yes," agreed the second prominent citizen, "but it's no wonder the governor felt good when he wrote that proclamation."

Replied the first citizen, "He has started on what seems to be a good administration and already there is talk of promoting him to some higher offi---""And besides," interrupted the second man, "the governor owns one of the largest turkey farms in the state."

To-day is Thanksgiving. Let us see what we have to thankful for. First, because we are alive and have reasonable health; because we are not narrow minded enough to think we are better than anybody else who tries to do right. We are thankful we do not adore vain clothes or have all on our back but our shoes. We are thankful we owe no one anything but good will and have plenty of that; thankful we can lay down at night with a clean conscience and think as we please. More thankful that no one has a right to growl if we want to sit on the top rail of the fence and whistle until we can look a cold hard proposition square in the face and feel better and stronger afterwards.

That's how Thanksgiving was, 100 years ago, in Columbia, KY -"Jim"


This story was posted on 2011-11-24 16:14:59
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