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Betsy Fausnaugh: Plum Granny may put Gradyville, KY on map

Writer seems to be thinking cultivation on Great America Pie Factory scale. They do things in a big way in Gradyville. (But it would be the second Adair County community to gain fame from Plum Grannies. Vester, KY - in Adair County the last time we checked and a contender for capitol of Burton Ridge - is home of Plum Granny authority Billy Kay Farris, the world's No. 1 Plum Granny advocate.. CM has no idea where Fausnaugh proposal could lead. To Plum Granny peace and prosperity or to cross county warfare similar to the old Cider Hill v. Cider Mill roadside signs battles in Southern Indiana. A unified Adair County Plum Granny Industry might see production for popular White Wine Sangria, for desperately needed sachets, for Plum Granny preserves and jellies, even a new variety for the heart of the Bull Run Wine Country. It is beyond our ken to decide on the risk. But, we're posting, even if it, in the words of the immortal "Jim," steers up a hornet's nest, because it could lead to something Big. -Ed Waggener
Click on headline for full Betsy Fausnaugh treatise and photo(s)

By Betsy Fausnaugh

I have been given a very interesting fruit that I was unfamiliar with. It is called a Plum Granny or Queen Anne's pocket fruit.

It is actually a small baseball size melon. Most people use it only for decoration. I am told that it's aromatic qualities can fill the home with a wonderful smell, better than any store bought concoction. Thus the name Queen Anne's Pocket fruit.


As baths were sometimes few and far between in early times, ladies would cut this fruit up and carry it in their pockets as a sachet to mask any unpleasant aromas.

However, I was also told it is edible and is best pickled, like watermelon rind. It is mostly seeds inside like the pomegranate, and very little flesh.

I have yet to cut into mine, but hope to save the seeds and have my own patch of Plum Grannies next year. Who knows, maybe I have stumbled upon the next crop to put Gradyville on the odd but interesting fruit map! - Betsy Fausnaugh


This story was posted on 2011-07-29 05:39:52
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Plum Granny: Could Gradyville, Ky gain fame with little melon?



2011-07-29 - Gradyville, KY - Photo by Elizabeth Fausnaugh.
Betsy Fausnaugh has been given a Plum Granny, and is fascinated by it. She wonders if the mighty fertile soil in the Gradyville, KY, might be a good place to raise Plum Grannies on a commercial basis, and be another item to put the Adair County community on the map - as if it weren't maybe already the perhaps most singularly famous village in the shire.

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