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Hopes higher black/turkey vulture ratio is temporary

Jon Halsey, who lives in Northern Adair County, counted 70 Black Vultures roosting in woods behind house, with more in the air. He's seeing fewer turkey vultures, those majestic, beguiling fliers he much favors over the new invaders
Comments re article 42548 BJ Fudge notices iincrease in Black Vultures

By Jon Halsey

Up thru last Fall we had about 6 to 10 Turkey Vultures on a daily basis. The wife used to chide me for being beguiled while watching them soar majestically on the updrafts coming over the ridge.


Lately they have been replaced by a large number of the black variety. They have taken up their nightly roost in the woods behind the barn and Thursday evening the wife and I counted 70. That was a conservative count since many of them stayed on the move and we ignored many lest we double count.

Hopefully when the Black Vultures move on the Turkey variety will return. As hideous as they appear on the ground, they are awe inspiring in the air.

s/Jon Halsey


This story was posted on 2011-02-19 17:09:43
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Birds of Kentucky: Turkey vultures, splendid soarers



2011-02-19 - 1535 Bull Run RD, Columbia, KY - Photo by Barbara Armitage.
"These two Turkey Vultures," writes Barbara Armitage, "feel a bit like I do 'coming and going at the same time.' " The birds, so spellbinding in flight, seem to be on a decline this year, with their less likeable cousins, Black Vulures, becoming predominate in some areas - a fact noted by Billy Joe Fudge, lamented by Jon Halsey.

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Birds of Kentucky: Black Vultures increasingly seen in Adair



2011-02-20 - Over Bull Run RD, Columbia, KY - Photo by Rodney Thompson.
Both Jon Halsey and Billy Joe Fudge have observed an increase in black vultures, with an increasing black to turkey vulture ratio. This black vulture sequence was photographed by Rodney Thompson and posted on October 19, 2009, with this information:Birds of KY: Black vulture flight over Bull Run, Adair Co., KY2009-10-19 - Bull Run RD, Columbia, KY - Photo by Rodney Thompson. Rodney Thompson caught this sequence of a black vulture flight over the Bull Run Creek area of Adair County. While the birds are not such a pretty sight as they do their clean-up work on the ground, they are majestic in flight. To submit your checklists in the Great Backyard Bird Count CLICK HERE For Columbia/Adair County, enter "Columbia, Kentucky" in the check boxes.

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