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Birds of Kentucky: Little Brown Birds - Song Sparrow

Learning to distinguish the 'Little Brown Birds,' Barbara Armitage discovers extraordinary traits of one of them, the Song Sparrow. It's all part of boning up for the Great Backyard Bird Count, February 18, 19, 20, and 21, 2011.
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By Barbara Armitage
Birding news from Adair County Garden Club

Sitting here at my computer and looking out at my feeders I can see 4 Blue Jays, 3 Cardinals, a Downey Woodpecker, a Titmouse and a Nuthatch, a host of Gold Finches and several of "them little brown birds". I am ashamed to say that I don't know their names.


Why haven't I taken the time to learn their names - it's like not knowing the names of your neighbors. Here they are living within a few feet of my table on the sun porch and I haven't been neighborly enough to learn something as simple as their name. It's downright un-Southern.

I plan on doing something about my un-excusable behavior, starting right now. I looked back through my photos of the past couple of weeks and I found this cute little Song Sparrow. I am going to focus on him first. I set up his photo as my "wallpaper" so that I will see him several times a day. I also read about Song Sparrows on my IBird - did you know that Song Sparrows are one of the most persistent singers throughout the spring and summer? They are such talented singers that Mockingbirds are not able to imitate their songs and appropriately a group of Song Sparrows is called a choir or chorus.

My camera and I are ready for the next "little brown bird" that comes to my feeder. I'll keep you posted on who shows up. -Barbara Armitage


This story was posted on 2011-02-01 08:00:08
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Birds of Kentucky: Song Sparrow, a very persistent singer



2011-02-01 - 135 Bull Run RD, Columbia, KY - Photo by Barbara Armitage.
Concerned with her own lack of expertise on distinguishing Little Brown Birds, Barbara Armitage decided to do something about it. She's reading about Song Sparrows, like the one above, on her iBird and found that Song Sparrows are one of the most persistent singers throughout the spring and summer? They are such talented singers that Mockingbirds are not able to imitate their songs and appropriately a group of Song Sparrows is called a choir or chorus. For more on these delightful songbirds, click to All About Birds: Song Sparrow, which includes a "Typical Voice," audio.

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