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Kentucky Color: Killing Zone

Searching for the solution to the mystery of a songbird kill, Billy Joe Fudge rounds up the usual suspects in his memory and concludes it was the work of loblolly dwelling owl. Then he considers the moral dilemma of creating a Bird of Prey attractant
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By Billy Joe Fudge, Retired Forester
Kentucky Division of Forestry

When I hung up my bird feeder several years ago, I never thought about how it could become a Bird of Prey attractant.


One morning recently I went out to get firewood and heard chirping beneath the feeder. I observed a small bird which was obviously suffering from some sort of injury.

After putting the wood in the fireplace, I looked around to see where a hawk or owl had put the little bird out of its misery and had ended up with a tasty breakfast to boot.

I believe it was an owl, for many mornings when I go out I will see one departing from his Loblolly Pine perch overlooking the feeder.

In the accompanying photo, you can see where the right wing tip touched down in the snow just before the left wing. Then in the center is where both feet scraped through the snow to grasp the little injured bird just short of the exposed rocks beneath my Weeping Crabapple tree that holds my feeder.

That is just nature's way and I am sure that owls deserve to eat the same as songbirds.

The next earlier Kentucky Color: Amazing Water


This story was posted on 2011-01-30 08:56:34
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Kentucky Color: Snow trail clues solve a murder mystery



2011-01-30 - Greenhills, Columbia, KY - Photo by Billy Joe Fudge, retired District Forester.
Billy Joe Fudge writes: "You can see, above, "where the right wing tip touched down in the snow just before the left wing. Then, in the center is where both feet scraped through the snow to grasp the little injured bird just short of the exposed rocks beneath my Weeping Crabapple tree which holds my feeder."

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