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Cyrus' revelation: How Adair Countian tipped scales to win WWI

Kaiser Bill would have known he was toast if he'd been aware that he was fighting Esther Gilmer Dohoney
A look back in the ancient annals of glorious old Adair County, Kentucky
By the late summer & early fall of 1918, the war was not going a bit well for Kaiser Wilhelm I of Germany. U.S. doughboys had his bloodthirsty Huns in disarray and on the run, and without a doubt, the Kaiser knew that plenty more sharpshooting steely-eyed Adair Countians were none too patiently awaiting their turn to have sport with his troops.

However, a front page article in the October 2, 1918 Adair County News almost certainly delivered the death blow and convinced ol' Kaiser Bill that he and his wanna-be empire were toast. I mean, wouldn't *you* immediately sue for peace if you found out the enemy was so tough, so resolved, and so determined to whip your butt that a hundred-year-old woman had "jined up" to help the cause? Can you not imagine him exclaiming, "Ach! All is lost!" as he read
Centenarian Registers for War Service

Mrs. Esther [Gilmer] Dohoney who celebrated her 100th birthday in May of this year, came down to the Court-House last week and registered for war activities. Mrs. Dohoney says that she is ready for any service called upon her to do.

(It was that at point Kaiser Bill dropped his hot-off-the-press copy of the Adair County News and began frantically searching for a white flag of surrender. It most likely would have made no difference had he read the the rest of the article-Cyrus):

This grand mother of American patriots in the glory of beautiful old age spends much of her time knitting for soldiers.

Mrs. Dohoney's registration was in response to appeals for women 16 & older to register for the Women's War Census which stated "No service is asked or expected of a woman except what she may freely offer, but she is requested by the government to register, in any case..."
Mrs. Dohoney lived nearly two years after helping bring down Kaiser Bill & his minions, and departed this vale of sorrows on September 13, 1920.

CyrusCentral Ohio Bureau Chief, ColumbiaMagazine.com
Editor's note: More on the Gilmer family is a-stew in the Authors', Severally, Crockpot. Anyone with information on the Gilmer family, the Gilmer Family Cemetery late of the Frank Dohoney, Holladay Place, now serenely inhumed at Union Cemetery, Milltown Church Road, Adair CO, KY, please let us know by emailing: ed@columbiamagazine.com.


This story was posted on 2006-05-13 13:26:02
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