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Big Trip To Chicago, IL - 1940

By: Col. Carlis B. Wilson

First Trip Out Of Adair County
Grandfather, daughter and I were going to Chicago, IL, to see Aunt Alice Wilson Coomer. This would be a big trip for me. At that time I had never seen a Passenger Train and not sure about a Greyhound Bus. We started out from Sparksville and caught the Bus at Columbia for the Train Station in Louisville, we were to board a Passenger Train for Chicago, IL.

On the way to Louisville I got motion sickness and was very sick for a while but got better before Louisville.

New Hat For The Occasion.
Grandpa Wilson bought me a new hat for the occasion and by the time we got to the train station in Louisville, I was not liking to wear that hat anymore. Aunt wanted to put it in the suitcase but I would not hear to that, nor would I wear it. She still reminds me of that at each family reunion.

A Child's Ticket
When Grandpa bought the tickets at the Train Depot; I was by his side when we got to the ticket window, I pulled my myself up to the window to see who was back there. Grandpa pushed me down and said; Down boy they will think you are a young man. He wanted to make sure he got me a child's ticket.

A Long Way To Chicago
It seem like a long ride to Chicago. Finally we got to the big city, when we arrived there was so much for a small country boy to see. We needed to ride a Street Car to get to Aunt Alice's house. I was dragging behind looking at everything in view, as we aborted the Street Car, Poppy and Aunt had already got on in front of me and I was the last passenger to get onboard. When I stepped up to the last step the Street Car took off and I was jerked backwards and would have fallen off but the conductor was near and reached out and caught my arm and rescued me from the fall.

I Never Told Them About It
I went to the seat and set very quietly until we got to the kinfolks house, To this day I suppose they never knew about that incident for I never told them about it. My cousins and I had a lot of fun while we were visiting them. I remember their home was close to a train track and when the trains would come by switching the freight cars, we would holler for chalk, of which I had never saw chalk so big before. We would use the chalk to make lines on the sidewalk for different games we were playing.

After A Week Of Visiting
After a week of visiting we returned to Adair county, and my next trip was about three years later. Upon which I went to another big city Indianapolis, Indiana, where my mother and step father lived. After a short stay in Indianapolis, I returning to Adair County in March 1944 stay until I graduated from Grade School in the year of 1948.

_Carlis


This story was posted on 2003-04-10 11:49:43
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