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Glasgow Net on CNN.com; Local Broadband update

Glasgow, KY has made nation news--again--for their citywide broadband deployment, this time in Sunday's CNN.com technology section.

Glasgow's impressive local network was originally installed to provide an alternate local cable system, but has since been expanded to offer very-high-speed internet access to local residents and businesses. Glasgow regularly gets national attention for their local network.

Options for broadband in Columbia have taken a different form, but we do now have a very viable option for many local citizens. CKIC, a joint venture of two local businessmen, is offering high-speed wireless internet at very affordable rates.

Unlike Glasgow's option, which is available exclusively within the city limits, CKIC's offering is available to anyone within range of their towers. A good rule of thumb for those out in the county: if you can see the water tower in town, you can probably get wireless broadband.

Speeds for wireless are generally considerably faster than dialup, especially in parts of Adair County where the age of the phone lines prevents even 56k connections by standard modem.

In addition, CKIC is locally owned, and the towers are fixed, so users won't be plagued with frequent service changes and the phone number bingo that users of larger ISPs have faced recently when trying to connect by dial-up in Adair County.

The service supports modern Windows operating systems and requires an open USB port on the connecting computer. However, we've managed to integrate it nicely with a hybrid Mac/Linux/Wired/Wireless network in the ColumbiaMagazine.com Advanced Computer Network Research Labs, where an impressive array of aging computer equipment, including a vintage 1970's Sony stereo, are connected to bring you the very best in local technology information.

For more information about CKIC, you can call 270-634-1332, or click here to send anemail.



This story was posted on 2003-02-04 17:52:40
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